Between the Lines – A girl’s first tattoos, usually done in the face, on the forehead, cheeks or chin …

A girl’s first tattoos, usually done in the face, on the forehead, cheeks or chin, were often excruciatingly painful, especially around the eyes, lips and between the eyebrows. “It would be impossible to keep your toes from wiggling,” said one elder, while the tattooist ran her needle and thread through the lampblack of the qulliq and stitched it through the young girl’s skin. “It felt like your face was on fire,” said another elder. Still others said it felt like sparks from the sun. Sessions could last whole days. At certain points, the girl might scream out for the tattooist to stop.Some say the tattooist probably prayed with every stitch, sometimes rubbing the soot in with a finger or her poker. She would gently remind the girl that the sea goddess denied access to the afterlife to women whose fingers weren’t tattooed. Women without face tattoos were banished to Noqurmiut, the “land of the crestfallen,” where they spent an eternity with their heads hanging down, smoke bellowing out of their throats.

Source: Between the Lines

Letters from Nunavut’s Next Generation

Nunavut’s Next Generation: Life in Iqaluit By Patrick White, Jan. 21, 2014 Few people have a better window on Nunavut’s youth than John Fanjoy, and few people are so irrepressibly optimistic about …

Source: Letters from Nunavut’s Next Generation

Our Language, Our Selves

By Alexina Kublu & Mick Mallon,

“…Is there a Canadian culture? Is there an Inuit culture? An Inuktitut word for “way of life” is inuusiq. Based on the word for person, inuk, it means something like “the way of being a person.” Is there a connection between the language I speak and the person I am? Let us tell you a story.
Some years ago, Kublu applied for a job with an Inuit organization in Ottawa, and dashed off the usual résumé. On checking it over, however, she thought, “But this is an Inuit organization. If the person who reads this résumé is a traditional Inuk, what will he think of it, and of me?”
So she translated it into Inuktitut . . . and it sounded arrogant, boastful, and cold, cold, cold. Then she sat down and wrote a résumé directly in Inuktitut. It came out fine, until she translated it into English. The English version was vague, unfocused, even wimpy!…”

Source: Our Language, Our Selves

Just think what the next generation [of Inuit] will be able to do.

Mark Kalluak “… Born in 1942, and raised traditionally on the western shore of Hudson Bay, Mark Kalluak was an author, Inuktitut literacy, cultural heritage and language coordinator, Kalluak was widely known as an expert on Inuit culture and language. As a businessman and former Arviat mayor, Kalluak received the Order of Canada in October of 1991 for his work in literacy, and worked tirelessly to ensure traditional knowledge was a staple of Nunavut school curriculum. The following is the first editorial written for Arviat Television by Kalluak who sadly passed away three weeks after writing this commentary…”

Source: Just think what the next generation will be able to do.

I’ll get you Willy Nilly

A well “Thawed out” piece.? Or are you “chilly” to it?

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$_57 (2)

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FOXY seeks a Female Digital Storytelling Facilitator only

FOXY seeks Female applicants only
for a Digital Storytelling Facilitator
for our 2016 Peer Leader Retreats!
FOXY (Fostering Open eXpression among Youth) is an arts-based sexual/mental health and leadership organization with an office located in Yellowknife. We offer programming for Northern and Indigenous young women (and soon, young men!) across the Canadian North. Our focus is on the process of learning through the arts, rather than producing artistic masterpieces. We are recruiting a Digital Storytelling Facilitator for two FOXY Peer Leader Retreats that will be offered to Northern youth who identify as female in summer 2016. These Retreats will occur at beautiful Blachford Lake Lodge, NWT, which is a 20-minute floatplane flight from Yellowknife.

The ideal FOXY Digital Storytelling Facilitator:
·       LOVES working with youth (aged 13-17 years)
·       Thinks creatively and outside the box
·       Enjoys being challenged
·       Works well within a diverse team
·       Has experience with producing short films and facilitating film workshops with youth
·       Has interest/experience in comprehensive sexual health education, mental health, health promotion, leadership education with youth, the North
·       Is adaptable and flexible as the Retreat is a constantly evolving environment
·       Is available July 26-August 5 and/or August 10-19, 2016 and can be at Blachford Lake Lodge with little or no Internet/phone access for a week at a time
·       Can provide a clean criminal records check (including vulnerable sector)
·       Should have valid First Aid/CPR
·       Female applicants only for this position; preference will be given to long-time Northerners and/or those who identify as Indigenous

This is a contract position; honoraria will be provided (as well as airfare and travel expenses for an individual who resides outside Yellowknife). All accommodation/food expenses are covered while at Blachford Lake Lodge.

For more information about FOXY, please check out our website at http://www.arcticfoxy.com, find us on Facebook at facebook.com/arcticfoxyNWT, or on Twitter @Arctic_FOXY.

Interested applicants please submit a resume and cover letter to FOXY Executive Director Candice Lys at Candice@arcticfoxy.com. This position will remain open until filled.
http://arcticfoxy.com/facilitatorjob/

Candice Lys, MA, PhD Candidate
Executive Director, FOXY
Ashoka Canada Affiliate
Research Associate, Institute for Circumpolar Health Research
FOXY; 240 Borden Drive, Yellowknife, NT  X1A 3R4
Tel: +1.867.444.9108 | Fax: +1.888.518.4945
Web: http://www.arcticfoxy.com
Email: candice@arcticfoxy.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ArcticFoxyNWT
Twitter: @Arctic_Foxy

ENCOURAGING ABORIGINAL VOICES AND ISSUES IN THE MEDIA

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The CJF Aboriginal Journalism Fellowships offer two Aboriginal journalists with one to 10 years of experience the chance to explore issues of interest to First Nations, Métis or Inuit peoples. The award aims to foster better comprehension of Aboriginal issues in Canada’s major media and community outlets.
DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 19, 2016
http://cjf-fjc.ca/awards/aboriginal_fellowship
Please take a look at the award details
before submitting your application.
http://www.cjf-fjc.ca/cjf_awards/?category=aboriginalform

Ok, let’s talk: A response to the Bell Let’s Talk campaign

Source: Ok, let’s talk: A response to the Bell Let’s Talk campaign

Ancestors – ᓯᕗᓪᓖᑦ Writing Competition For Nunavut Youth.

Ancestors – ᓯᕗᓪᓖᑦ Writing Competition For Nunavut Youth.
Format: Essay or short story
Length: Minimum 250 words and up to 500 words
Submission deadline: Friday, April 15, 2016, midnight PT
Prizes: 1st Prize $300.00, 2nd Prize $200.00 3rd Prize $100.00
Theme: Pre-colonization Inuit with a focus on *social organization, ᐃᓄᑐᖃᐃᑦ ᐃᓕᖁᓯᑐᖃᖏᑦ ᐊᑐᖅᖢᒋᑦ ᐃᓅᖃᑎᒋᓐᓂᖅ.
Submissions to:
Susan Aglukark arcticrose2016@gmail.com – subject line – Ancestors 2016
Word Challenge: Use two traditional Inuktitut words on the verge of being lost.
Goal: To better understand the traditional Inuit society and by extension its respect of life’s cycle.
Preamble: My mother pointed out to me some years ago that there is a difference between learning and becoming educated ᐃᓕᑦᓯᓂᖅ and ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᓂᖅ, this was a profound moment for me as it was then that I began to understand that Inuit have a long history of learning and teaching which also meant and means that we were a highly organized and functioning society with a high respect for life and capacity to learn.
The theme in this writing competition then is “Traditional Society”, to find an area in the traditional social historical past and explain it in an essay or story format, this can be written in all Inuktitut or all English but be sure to include at least 2 traditional Inuktitut words that we do not hear in our current daily dialogue.

The Northern Journal is for sale

lNorthern-Journal-ogo-clear

Publishers Don & Sandra Jaque wish to retire
(after 40 years).
Seeking someone who wishes to carry it on.
Award winning with NWT/Alberta circulation of 5000 (print) and 4700 (online)…
Includes trained, quality staff of five …
Most profitable if operated in Yellowknife or Hay River

207 McDougal Road, P.O. Box 990
Fort Smith, Northwest Territories
(867) 872-3000

Contact don@norj.ca

http://norj.ca/

https://www.facebook.com/NorthernJournal/

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