#SamKnows #Yellowknife Broadband Measurement Project #NWT #CRTC #Whitebox

SamKnows #Yellowknife Broadband Measurement Project #NWT #CRTC #Whitebox
https://youtu.be/st8OX9ihAUM


“… Dear GEORGE
Thank you for participating in the Canadian Broadband Measurement Project.
Unfortunately, your unit has not reported any data since 10-Dec-16, and we are wondering if the unit is still connected.
To resolve the problem: Ensure your Whitebox is connected to your modem/router. Reboot the Whitebox by either switching the power off and on or briefly unplugging the device.
Please send us an email to […] and we will confirm if the problem is fixed.
We really do need your consistent support for the long term, so please switch your test box back on today. As part of the SamKnows panel, we give you access to your own data via an online reporting system, and also a monthly email report card to allow you to compare performance and communicate with your ISP.
Thank you for your support.
Kind regards,
SamKnows …”
“… Join our Canadian campaign… Sign up with us today to accurately measure your broadband performance
The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) and SamKnows have established the ‘Measuring Broadband Canada’ program in order to provide Canadian citizens with reliable and accurate data concerning broadband provision across the country.
Anyone who would like to be part of this project just needs to sign up. It might be worth reading the requirements before doing so just to make sure you’re eligible to join!
On signing up, volunteers will receive a purpose-built broadband measurement unit, also known as a SamKnows Whitebox. The Whitebox is easy to install; once it has been plugged into the existing modem / router then it is good to go. Volunteers will also be able to see their own data from their broadband connection using a purpose-built SamKnows dashboard.
Please note, not everyone who registers will necessarily receive a SamKnows Whitebox. We do want to thank everyone for signing up and for working together to make Canadian broadband better!…”
https://www.measuringbroadbandcanada.com/

“…What is the Broadband Measurement Project?
In 2015, the CRTC launched a project to objectively measure broadband Internet performance, including actual connection speeds, in Canadian homes. It collaborated in this innovative project, a first for Canada, with major Canadian Internet service providers (ISPs) and SamKnows, a UK-based company that has built a global Internet measurement platform that spans five continents.
The data, collected from approximately 5,000 Canadian volunteers, from across the country, will inform the CRTC’s future broadband policy-making.
The data will also provide Canadians with a greater understanding of whether Internet services from participating ISPs are delivered at the advertised speeds and allow ISPs to improve their networks to better serve existing customers, and promote products to potential new customers.
The key output of the project is the annual report, developed and reviewed by all participants.
How is data collected for the Broadband Measurement Project?
A device known as a Whitebox is connected to a volunteer’s home modem or router and monitors the broadband performance when no one is using the Internet connection. This performance data is made available to the volunteer via a Web portal and is also available to the CRTC and the ISP providing the service. …”
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/internet/proj.htm

Becky Qilavvaq’s “Feel the Inukness” 230,634 hit #video “… u know u wanna dance; don’t fight the feeling!…”

feel-the-inukness

Feel the Inukness #BexxStudio #video “… u know u wanna dance; don’t fight the feeling! (made by Becky Qilavvaq / starring Anguti Johnston)…” 230,634 views

 

Becky Kilabuk
Artist, Throatsinger, Short Filmmaker at BexxStudio
Nunavut, Canada
https://www.linkedin.com/in/becky-kilabuk-a5193135

“Everyone is waking up”: Tanya Tagaq on fighting for justice and singing for Björk

“….Protest music has found an avant-garde champion in the formidable grunts and howls of Inuk throat singer Tanya Tagaq. April Clare Welsh finds out how the First Nations activist and Björk collaborator is using her platform to shine a light on Canada’s dark history […]Tagaq believes that online activism like the virtual mob that flocked to Standing Rock has become “absolutely crucial” in the global fight for Indigenous rights. “Indigenous people have been fighting for the planet for a very, very long time,” she says, “but everyone is waking up to it now. You see these elders engaging in peaceful protests and getting pepper-sprayed by billionaire companies that just want more money – in 2016 that’s just unacceptable. Too many people are awake to accept that behaviour.”[…] Tagaq herself is a survivor of Canada’s notorious Residential School System, a forced assimilation programme which operated from the late 19th century right until 1996, taking Indigenous children away from their communities and placing them in boarding schools around the country. Around 6,000 students died during the residential schools’ existence, and sexual and physical abuse was endemic – though Tagaq emphasises that she doesn’t carry personal pain from her time at high school: “I wouldn’t want to take anything away from the people who suffered the massive indignities themselves.”….”
Tanya Tagaq – Retribution

Tanya Tagaq “Uja” and “Umingmak” (live) — Polaris Music Prize 2014

Ancestors – ᓯᕗᓪᓖᑦ Writing Competition For Nunavut Youth.

Ancestors – ᓯᕗᓪᓖᑦ Writing Competition For Nunavut Youth.
Format: Essay or short story
Length: Minimum 250 words and up to 500 words
Submission deadline: Friday, April 15, 2016, midnight PT
Prizes: 1st Prize $300.00, 2nd Prize $200.00 3rd Prize $100.00
Theme: Pre-colonization Inuit with a focus on *social organization, ᐃᓄᑐᖃᐃᑦ ᐃᓕᖁᓯᑐᖃᖏᑦ ᐊᑐᖅᖢᒋᑦ ᐃᓅᖃᑎᒋᓐᓂᖅ.
Submissions to:
Susan Aglukark arcticrose2016@gmail.com – subject line – Ancestors 2016
Word Challenge: Use two traditional Inuktitut words on the verge of being lost.
Goal: To better understand the traditional Inuit society and by extension its respect of life’s cycle.
Preamble: My mother pointed out to me some years ago that there is a difference between learning and becoming educated ᐃᓕᑦᓯᓂᖅ and ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᓂᖅ, this was a profound moment for me as it was then that I began to understand that Inuit have a long history of learning and teaching which also meant and means that we were a highly organized and functioning society with a high respect for life and capacity to learn.
The theme in this writing competition then is “Traditional Society”, to find an area in the traditional social historical past and explain it in an essay or story format, this can be written in all Inuktitut or all English but be sure to include at least 2 traditional Inuktitut words that we do not hear in our current daily dialogue.

W.C. Fields speaks Inuktitut? – The Diner Sketch – YouTube

W.C. Fields – The Diner Sketch – YouTube.

 http://youtu.be/yOHGr8r5Cs4?t=4m10s

“…Northern friends – anyone notice a very peculiar word about halfway through this sketch?…”

Distinctively…. “qallunaaq”
and not a bad pronunciation to my ear…
for Hollywood
especially at that date…
http://youtu.be/yOHGr8r5Cs4?t=4m10s
Distinctively…. at 4:19
and not a bad pronunciation to my ear…
for Hollywood
especially at that date…
Then W.C. Fields repeats it and says
“… I haven’t been called that for two days…”

“…To her colleagues at the college where Kublu works, she is, we hope, an equal, with a professional competence extending beyond her particular role as instructor of interpretation and translation. To her students, she is a role model, one who has attained a balance between two worlds. To herself . . . well, she knows she can never be the kind of Inuk her elders were, but, with all due respect, she doesn’t want to be. And she never could be a “qallunaaq” (white person). …”

http://www.nunavut.com/nunavut99/english/our.html

Iqqaumavara – Je m’en souviens, I Remember, ᐃᕐᖃᐅᒪᕙᕋIqqaumavara | Je m’en souviens

Iqqaumavara – Je m’en souviens, I Remember, ᐃᕐᖃᐅᒪᕙᕋIqqaumavara | Je m’en souviens.

 

ᐃᕐᖃᐅᒪᕙᕋ

ᐃᕐᖃᐅᒪᒋᔭᐅᑦᓴᐃᓇᖁᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᐃᓚᒌᑦ ᓱᕐᕋᑕᐅᔪᕕᓃᑦ ᑕᒪᑦᓱᒧᖓ ᐱᓗᑲᓐᓂᕕᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓅᖃᑎᒋᔭᓂ.
ᐊᖏᓂᕐᐹᖅ ᖃᕆᑕᐅᔭᒃᑯᑦ ᑐᑭᓯᓂᐊᕐᕕᐅᒍᓐᓇᑐᖅ ᐃᓄᐃᑦ ᓅᑕᐅᓂᕕᓂᖓᑕ ᖁᑦᓯᑐᒧᑦ ᒥᑦᓵᓄᑦ 1953ᒥ 1955ᒥᓗ.


ᐃᓄᑦᑎᑐᑦ

 

 

oie_6182544SMWKQ8cL

Logo http://i0.wp.com/www.iqqaumavara.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/oie_6182544SMWKQ8cL.png?w=625

“… Je m’en souviens

Pour préserver la mémoire des familles touchées par ce drame humain.
La plus grande source d’information sur le web dédiée à la réinstallation forcée d’Inuit en Extrême Arctique en 1953 et 1955.


Français

 

 

….”

Native American, Alaska Native, Inuit & First Nations Traditional Values, Beliefs, and Knowledge Survey Launched

“Native American, Alaska Native, Inuit & First Nations Traditional Values, Beliefs, and Knowledge Survey Launched”

Original montage for the 2007 Deh Cho Drum “Year in Review” issue For my employer, http://nnsl.com

Original montage for the 2007 Deh Cho Drum “Year in Review” issue
For my employer, http://nnsl.com

———- Forwarded message ———-

From: Andrew Hund <axh69@cwru.edu>
Date: 20 May 2014 10:05
Subject: Press Release — Traditional Values, Beliefs, and Knowledge Survey

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: 5/20/2014

News Release from Andrew Hund, M.A., Ph.D.

“Native American, Alaska Native, Inuit & First Nations Traditional Values, Beliefs, and Knowledge Survey Launched”

(Al Ain, UAE) — A new research study is being conducted by Andrew Hund. This questionnaire is designed to gather general information about indigenous and non-indigenous people views of values, beliefs, and knowledge. The study is designed to establish a baseline of Native American, Alaska Native, and Canadian first Nations traditional values and beliefs. The questionnaire focuses on participant’s interactions with others, as well as their perception of subsistence, emotions, and health and illness.

Participants’ responses are anonymous. The information collected will be added with the opinions of others that complete this questionnaire and following the data collection, an analysis will be performed.The results of this study will be used for educational purposes. There is no risk to you from participating in this survey; this survey is voluntary and you may quit at anytime. The questionnaire takes between 5-10 minutes to complete. The study will be conducted until at least August 2014.

The anonymous survey can be accessed at:
http://www.surveymethods.com/EndUser.aspx?F2D6BAA3FBB5AFA1F1

———- Forwarded message ends -30- ———-

The corner of Sainte Catherine’s and Atwater and the Pepsi Forum. | Flickr – Photo Sharing!

 

“… The corner of Sainte Catherine's and Atwater and the Pepsi Forum. The famous Montreal Forum, where the Montreal Canadiens used to play until the Molson Centre (now the Bell Centre) opened in 1996, got gutted and transformed into a shopping and entertainment complex in the late 1990s. …”

The corner of Sainte Catherine’s and Atwater and the Pepsi Forum. | Flickr – Photo Sharing!.

The corner of Sainte Catherine’s and Atwater and the Forum.
“… The famous Montreal Forum, where the Montreal Canadiens used to play [hockey] until the Molson Centre (now the Bell Centre) opened in 1996, got gutted and transformed into a shopping and entertainment complex in the late 1990s. …”

Canada’s Best Small Towns – Rankin Inlet Nunavut, Ft Smith NWT & Yukon’s Dawson City

[excerpt from The Great Canadian Bucket List]

Nunavut – RANKIN INLET Credit: Rankin Inlet

With fewer than 2500 people, the hamlet of Rankin Inlet is the second most populous community in Nunavut. Although Iqaluit defeated Rankin to become Nunavut’s capital, Rankin Inlet is well known for its artist community, particularly in ceramics, print, carvings, casting and painting. Rankin serves as the business and transportation hub of the Kivalliq region, and offers services absent from many northern communities. These include cell phone service, cable, satellite, recreational facilities (golf, volleyball, indoor arenas and outdoor fields). The surrounding landscape is largely untouched, with the Iqalugaarjuup Nunanga Territorial Historic Park a popular spot for hiking, fishing and bird watching. The community comes together for craft shows, square dances, Pakalluk Time (a town festival) and Christmas activities.

Northwest Territories: FORT SMITH 

Fort Smith

Fort Smith a multicultural community surrounded by boreal forest, with a population of 2500.   The town sits at the gateway of Wood Buffalo National Park, the largest national park in Canada, and one for the Bucket List.  Townsfolk enjoy summer activities amongst pristine beauty, including kayaking, hiking, biking and golfing.  For rafters, the Slave River presents some of the most challenging rapids on the continent.  Sitting on the banks of the Slave River, community spirit is stoked with the South Slave Friendship Festival in August and the Wood Buffalo Winter Frolic in March, attracting artists and musicians from around the territory.  Visitors are also drawn to the Forth Smith’s Northern Life Museum and Cultural Centre.

Yukon: DAWSON CITY

Dawson City

Dawson City was once the largest city west of Winnipeg and north of San Francisco, known as the Paris of the North.   The 1898 Klondike Gold Rush brought tens of thousands of prospectors to this small town, most of which returned penniless, their fate immortalized in the legendary poems of Robert Service.  Today, with a population of around 1300, the well-preserved town is home to several national historical sites, and draws thousands of tourists visiting Yukon or Alaska. Visitors can still pan for gold, or visit heritage homes and museums.  Dawson City’s Downtown Hotel is also home to the Sour Toe Cocktail, the most infamous drink of the North (and on The Great Canadian Bucket List)

 

via Canada’s Best Small Towns – The Great Canadian Bucket List.

Features | Inuktitut Tusaalanga

A glossary/mini-dictionary containing 1400+ Inuktitut terms accessible either in romanized or syllabic Inuktitut. 20+ dialogues with full audio and optional English definitions An index to the Inuktitut grammar concepts.

via Features | Inuktitut Tusaalanga.

https://i2.wp.com/www.tusaalanga.ca/system/files/imagecache/ios_slider/2%20-%20First.jpg

https://i1.wp.com/www.tusaalanga.ca/system/files/imagecache/ios_slider/10.jpg

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