Yellowknife NWT Town Hall on Climate Change #CanClimateAction – YouTube

Yellowknife NWT Town Hall on Climate Change #CanClimateAction

NWT MP Michael McLeod and the City of Yellowknife, along with Canadian Minister of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna, will hold a town hall discussion to engage citizens, including Indigenous peoples, in a discussion on clean growth and climate change. The purpose of the town hall series is to raise awareness of climate change issues and get various communities across the country involved in finding viable solutions. Feedback from Canadians will contribute to Canada’s approach on climate change.
Event: Town hall
Date: Monday, July 11, 2016
Time: 7:30 p.m. [MST]
Location: Somba K’e Civic Plaza

With Mark Heyck, Mayor of Yellowknife
Catherine McKenna, Canada’s Minister of Environment & Climate Change
and Michael McLeod, Member of Parliament for the Northwest Territories
http://www.climatechange.gc.ca
http://letstalkclimateaction.ca
Presentation to the Minister of a City of Yellowknife glass created by Old Town Glassworks http://www.oldtownglassworks.com

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Public Photography is No Crime – PEN Canada concerned by arrest of Toronto Star photographer

EXCERPT “… We are especially concerned about the way recent trends in enforcement of non-existent prohibitions on photography and filming are affecting members of the press.
This document is not intended to be an exhaustive examination of all laws as they pertain to photography and filming. The issue is complicated and depends to some extent on laws that vary from province to province and municipality to municipality.
Subject to certain very limited constraints, it is not a crime in Canada for anyone to do any of the following things, and it is a violation of their Charter rights to prevent anyone from doing so:
– photographing or filming in any public place, or in any private place to which the public is admitted, and publishing those pictures and films,
– taking pictures of or filming in any government site other than “restricted access areas”*
– photographing or filming police officers in public, as long as the photographer/filmmaker does not obstruct or interfere with the execution of police duties. While everyone has a reasonable expectation of privacy in certain circumstances, police officers have no reasonable expectation of privacy as they go about their duties.
A police officer does not have the right to confiscate cameras or recording equipment (including phones), unless the person in possession of such equipment is under arrest and such equipment is necessarily relevant to the alleged offence. A police officer cannot force anyone to show, unlock or decrypt cameras or recording equipment, or to delete images, even when that person is under arrest, unless the police officer has a warrant or a court order permitting him to do so.
At no time, and under no circumstances, is anyone in Canada subject to arrest for the simple act of taking a photograph or filming, although he or she can be arrested if he or she is breaking another law in the process, such as, for example, trespassing or breaking or entering.
Other laws and legislation, including the Criminal Code, the Copyright Act, the Security of Information Act, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), must be obeyed while taking or publishing pictures….”
https://pencanada.ca/blog/public-photography-is-not-a-crime/

NWT Ice Roads Commorative Historic Monument Dedication

The Historical Sites and Monuments Board of Canada and Parks Canada dedication ceremony for a plaque celebrating the role ice roads have played in opening up the north to settlement and resource development.
WHEN: July 7, 2016 at 2:00 p.m.
WHERE: Rotary Park, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories
Commemorating the Establishment of Ice Roads in the Northwest Territories
With Jonah Mitchell, Parks Canada; Chief Edward Sangris of the Yellowknife’s Dene First Nation with the Dettah Drummers; Dr. Tom Andrews, NWT Member of the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada and Mark Heyck, Mayor of the City of Yellowknife
NWT Ice Roads Commorative Historic Monument Dedication

Exiled to the North, a Reporter Finds a New Enemy in the RCMP

Reporter John McFadden by Walter Strong.

Except – “…When McFadden first showed up in Yellowknife, people didn’t know what to make of him. He carried a big city sense of journalistic duty to a place smaller than his hometown of Orangeville, Ontario; 20,000 vs 27,000. He gained readers quickly, but made enemies just as fast. It was the RCMP who jumped the line; banning him from news conferences, forcibly removing the writer from the courthouse in an episode that resulted in the Justice department compensating him for torn clothes. But most profoundly, it led to the Mounties challenging McFadden after he criticized the force for refusing to alert the public when sexual predators were released from prison, even though it’s a policy that was changed after the reporters’ protests. … This was merely a prelude, however, to what happened last July in Yellowknife outside the Black Knight pub, where McFadden was cuffed, thrown in a police cruiser and hauled off to the cells, where he was kept for a number of hours after being charged with obstruction of police, an offence related to pictures he was taking of a van that the police were tearing apart in one of the city’s busiest downtown neighbourhoods. McFadden claims that he was not obstructing police procedure, while the cops—three of whom were questioned on the stand a few weeks ago at the beginning of the most sensational trial in Yellowknife in the last decade—insist that he was inside the van, or “breaking the plane,” in the words of one of the officers. If the three policemen who testified produced varying accounts of the incident, one thing was consistent: McFadden, who emerged from the Black Knight after midnight to investigate the nature of the police operative (centred around the van’s stolen plates and the identification of the vehicle’s owner, a very drunk man who immediately complied with the search), was portrayed as a person who was “yelling and screaming” and creating havoc as he approached the van. The presence of the reporter might have been alarming to the constables, but it was one in which most Yellowknifers, by this point, have become familiar. You heard him, and you knew who it was. You either turned around or charged forward, depending on what kind of night you were looking to have. ..”
http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/exiled-to-the-north-a-reporter-finds-a-new-enemy-in-the-rcmp?utm_source=vicefbca

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