NACO in the North: It’s lesson time in Yellowknife for composer Carmen Braden

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Fred Cattroll/National Arts Centre Jean-Hee Lee and Susan Rupp are upstaged by a witch at J.H. Sissons School in Yellowknife. (Fred Cattroll/National Arts Centre)

Photograph by: Fred Cattroll , National Arts Centre

[excerpt]

YELLOWKNIFE – Seven people around a table, sifting, sorting, polishing. An experienced composer, a young composer, and others there to learn.
[…]

One of the seven people around the table was Carmen Braden from Yellowknife. The young composer, 27-years old, received Alexina Louie’s advice during a public workshop under the stage lights at the Northern Arts and Cultural Centre.

Braden found out the orchestra was coming to Yellowknife and offering educational events, bringing Louie with it, and sought feedback.

Wednesday was a busy day for the orchestra, with 15 such events scheduled out of more than 50 educational activites on the tour, which also includes six concerts. There were workshops from orchestra members like Donnelly and Renshaw, and featured guests like Mark and Sivuarapik. Small groups of brass and strings played at schools and retirement homes. Acclaimed Canadian violinist James Ehnes was to hold a master class, while Norwegian conductor Arild Remmereit was scheduled for a choir conducting workshop.

Braden sent some her scores and recordings to Louie before they met, giving the experienced composer a sense of her strengths and weaknesses, “which was what I was looking for because up here you don’t get a lot of people at that professional level able to give critical feedback,” Braden says.

“That’s what I was really hoping for, and it really was very successful.”

[…]

 

 

 

 

 

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See on www.ottawacitizen.com

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Safety advisory for journalists covering hurricanes and tropical storms « INSI Blog

Safety advisory for journalists covering hurricanes and tropical storms « INSI Blog.

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From Ship To Sherlock:Arthur Conan Doyle’s ‘Arctic’ Diary called Dangerous Work: Diary of an Arctic Adventure

See on Scoop.itNunavut Stories

On Thursday, July 29, 1880, Doyle wrote, “Came across a most extraordinary natural snow house, about 12 feet high, shaped like a beehive with a door and a fine room inside in which I sat. Traveled a considerable distance, and would have gone to the Pole, but my matches ran short and I couldn’t get a smoke.” (Courtesy of University of Chicago Press)

 

[excerpt]

In 1880, years before creating Sherlock Holmes, a young Arthur Conan Doyle went to the Arctic as the surgeon aboard a whaling ship. He recorded his adventures in journals full of notes and drawings, which have been published for the first time in a book called Dangerous Work.

On June 15, 1880, Arthur Conan Doyle wrote a vivid sentence in his diary. It read, “The only difference in the weather is that the fog is thicker and the wind more utterly odious and depraved.”

Knowing that he was the creator of Sherlock Holmes, you might think Doyle is referring to the thick London fog drifting outside the windows of 221B Baker Street. But this sentence was written years before the first Holmes novel and it describes a considerably harsher environment — the thick fog and depraved wind of the Arctic, where Doyle traveled when he was 20.

Doyle’s journals from that voyage have now been published for the first time in a book called Dangerous Work: Diary of an Arctic Adventure. Jon Lellenberg, one of the editors of the book, joins NPR’s Steve Inskeep to discuss Doyle’s early influences and the story of how he ended up on an Arctic whaling ship.

[…]

Hear this National Public Radio program here:

http://api.npr.org/m3u/1163606575-9c2ef0.m3u?orgId=1&topicId=1033

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See on www.northcountrypublicradio.org

B.C. teen arrested for photographing mall takedown – British Columbia – CBC News

See on Scoop.itMediaMentor

A B.C. teen says his rights were violated when he was set upon by security guards and arrested by police after taking photographs at Metrotown shopping mall in Burnaby, B.C.

[excerpt]

Jakub Markiewicz ,16, said he was in the mall in September and took a picture of what he thought was a newsworthy event — a man being arrested by security guards.

But Markiewicz said the guards quickly turned on him, demanding he delete the photo, which he couldn’t do because he was shooting on a film camera.

[…]

Lawyer Douglas King, of Pivot Legal in Vancouver, agrees, saying that private mall security guards and police have no right to try to seize someone’s camera or demand that photos be deleted — even on private property.

[…]

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See on www.cbc.ca

CITY DAILY PHOTO NEWS: IN FOCUS – Life in Inuvik NWT

See on Scoop.itNWT News

[excerpt]

Way up north lies a land of extremes — sometimes 24 hour sunlight, sometimes 24-hour darkness; a land where the earth is frozen solid year-round – even in summer but a few feet below the surface.

In that land, where temperatures can plummet to 50 below, where the Arctic Wolf hunts in packs and the Great Horned Owl scours the tundra, stands the town of Inuvik in Canada’s North West Territories.

What could there be in Inuvik to appeal to a young media-savvy chap from Ottawa, like Philippe Morin?

Continued here……:

http://dailyphotoportalnews.blogspot.com.au/2012/10/in-focus-life-in-inuvik.html

“…Philippe has worked in and around the Inuvik community since 2006 as a reporter for CBC North. He shoots with a Nikon D90, but drools over the D200….”

Philippe Morin’s Twitter http://twitter.com/PhilippeMorinNT

CBC North http://www.cbc.ca/north

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See on dailyphotoportalnews.blogspot.ca

Looks like a great book for Christmas!

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franhurcombphotography

“In just 80 years, Yellowknife’s Old Town has undergone huge changes. What started as the centre of a 1930s gold-mining frontier town has become the relaxed, though often-controversial, historic neighbourhood of today’s modern capital city of the Northwest Territories. Despite the changes, Old Town has maintained a lot of its original character.

Author and photographer Fran Hurcomb moved to Old Town in 1975. In this book, she traces its evolution using more than 200 photos, most of them her own. Images of dog teams, shacks, Old Timers, float planes, houseboats and assorted characters illustrate a text covering everything from Old Town’s ongoing battles with City Hall, to how to build a houseboat, to the history of intriguing neighbourhoods such as the Woodyard and Jolliffe Island. This sometimes personal account looks at how Old Town itself has changed, as well as how this vibrant community has changed lives.”

“Old Town” will…

View original post 65 more words

Smithsonian 2012 Inuit Studies Free Online Conference Oct 25th – Oct 27th

See on Scoop.itNunavut Stories

Laimikie Palluq field tests a new Inuktitut interface for a GPS/fieldcomputer that he and six other hunters co-developed with geomatics engineering students as part of the Igliniit Project, a Canadian IPY project 2006-2010. Photo: Shari Gearheard

 

The 2012 Inuit Studies Online Conference will cover a broad spectrum of topics, including climate change and indigenous people; international cooperation in the Arctic; roles of Museums and museum collections in preserving Inuit languages, heritage, and culture; governmental programs in the northern regions and their interactions with local communities and Inuit cultural/political institutions. Please join us for three full days of engaging and informative sessions with experts from around the world. This online conference is available at no cost.

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See on inuit.smithsonianconference.org

The Plagiarist Codex: An Old Maya Information Hieroglyph (1988) at Monoskop Log

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“We have discovered from the barren wastelands of Central America an essential document in the early history of copyist strategies. Thought to have been created toward the end of the classical period of Mayan civilization, 998 A.D., the codex has been translated by a brilliant group of London plagiarists & the esteemed Amendant Hardiker from Wisconsin. Originally published by Plagerizedæ (Sic) Books in 1988 on the occasion of the Festival of Plagiarism held in London, San Francisco & Madison, WI. It is now distributed by Xexoxial Endarchy.” (mIEKAL aND, 1998)

http://www.nettime.org/Lists-Archives/nettime-l-9802/msg00072.html

“Something of a manifesto for plagiarism, Wisconsin style. Speaks to the enrichment of cultural dialogue through the reuse of old ideas in new combinations. An extension of collage theory if you will, in that not only are images and texts conflumed in a single multitrack, they are enriched by their new context and the new way they are perceived. The booklet consists of a series of ideograms put next to series of words, parallel text like the Rosetta Stone, serving to transliterate the sense of the pictures. Some, it would seem, are genuinely Maya, others are not. The coinages are exquisite: a useful one is “imagiarism”. Speaks of a communal body of ideas to which everyone has unabashed and inalienable rights. How can you steal whatʼs already yours?” (from the PhotoStatic Magazine review, 1988)

http://psrf.detritus.net/pdf/p29.pdf

Publisher Plagerizedæ (Sic) Books, Madison, Wisconsin, 1988
Distributed by Xexoxial Editions
ISBN 1440442851
50 pages
via Xerox Sutra Editions

distributor

Download

http://monoskop.org/images/5/5a/The_Plagiarist_Codex.pdf

 

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Nunavut » Return of the Far Fur Country

See on Scoop.itNunavut Stories

Photo: The contrasting views of Kimmirut in 1919 and 2012

[excrpt]

In September we were excited to travel to Nunavut to screen and give presentations on the Far Fur Country project. The highlight was traveling to Kimmirut, formerly Lake Harbour where the HBC had filmed extensive scenes in 1919 for the Romance of the Far Fur Country. It was amazing to see the contrasts between what we’d seen in the footage, and how the community has grown and changed over the decades. A happy coincidence while we were in Kimmirut, the yearly sea lift arrived, bringing a shipment by barge from a cargo ship off shore, a great contrast to the archival footage of the arrival of the Nascopie to Lake Harbour in 1919.

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See on blog.returnfarfurcountry.ca

The Buffalo Wolves

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Wildlife filmmaker Jeff Turner travels to Wood Buffalo National Park to witness the one place on earth where wolves prey on buffalo.

[excerpt]

A pack of wolves is hunting a small herd of buffalo across a frozen landscape. It’s a scene out of the ancient past, when buffalo and wolves once roamed the plains of North America. However this location is in northern Canada in Wood Buffalo National Park where this ancient relationship has continued uninterrupted for thousands of years.

Wolves and Buffalo follows the fortunes of one pack of wolves, the Delta Pack. Will the pups survive their first year? Will the packs alpha animals retain their pack position to breed again next year? As they try to bring down the buffalo to keep themselves and their new pups alive what will the future hold for these ancient warriors?

Observing wolves in their natural environment is never easy but wildlife filmmaker Jeff Turner has had more luck than most over the years. More than 20 years ago he first went to Wood Buffalo Park and filmed an event between these two species that had not been seen for more than a hundred years: wolves hunting buffalo. Due to recent industrial energy developments in northern Canada Jeff is returning to learn more about their unique relationship and what the future holds for both wolves and buffalo.

[…]

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See on www.cbc.ca

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