Exclusive: Toronto police arrest man, take phone after attempt to film takedown at Sheraton | Toronto Star

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St. Catharines man sues Toronto police over his arrest while he was making a video to document an arrest of a fellow Sheraton hotel guest.

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Northern_Clips‘s insight:

"…Karl Andrus alleges in a statement of claim that he was threatened with arrest as he used his BlackBerry smartphone to document another arrest in the lobby of the downtown Sheraton Centre Hotel, where he was also a guest.

Andrus was told that he’d “filmed enough” and, although other guests were around him, was told repeatedly to back up.

And then, “suddenly and without warning” he was “violently attacked” by an officer and “subjected to various forms of strikes and pressures,” he alleges.

Security video shows Andrus, who suffered numerous injuries including rib fractures, being taken down by a number of officers. He was also charged with obstructing and assaulting police…."

 

See on www.thestar.com

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“Best” of Yellowknife?

See on Scoop.itNWT News

The voting for the “Best of Yellowknife 2013” from the successful nominees will begin on May 15th at 8:00 am PST. Voters will be able to vote for their favourites by completing the online voting form. In order to vote, you will need to register on the site with an email address or by logging in with your Facebook account. One vote, per category, per person.

Voting will be open from May 21st at 8:00 am PST and will close on June 14th at noon PST.

Winners will be announced online on Monday, June 21st at 8am PST at bestof.HQYellowknife.com..

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Northern_Clips‘s insight:

There are lots errors and merchants misplaced in incorrect categories… not very fair to those in the competition…
And by the way… why is the best store in town… the dump… not even listed…. shame… and not a single mention of the second best store in town… St Pat’s Bazzar…

See on bestof.hqyellowknife.com

A newborn 20-minute-old wood bison calf taking its first steps

See on Scoop.itNWT News

Published on May 9, 2013

Learning to walk is the first step toward surviving in the wild. Experience rare video footage of a newborn 20-minute-old wood bison calf taking its first steps.

 

 

Northern_Clips‘s insight:

From Wood Baffalo National Park…. Published on May 9, 2013
Learning to walk is the first step toward surviving in the wild. Experience rare video footage of a newborn 20-minute-old wood bison calf taking its first steps.

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See on www.youtube.com

Eskimos, and whites in Canada’s Northwest Territories, 1941

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Eskimos, and whites in Canada’s 1941 #NWT – YouTube
North West Frontier: study of Indians, Eskimos, and whites living together and interacting in settlements in Canada’s Northwest Territories, 1941

 

 

Northern_Clips‘s insight:

Eskimos, and whites in Canada’s 1941 #NWT – YouTube
North West Frontier: study of Indians, Eskimos, and whites living together and interacting in settlements in Canada’s Northwest Territories, 1941

See on www.youtube.com

Here’s Ai Weiwei’s Music Video For “Dumbass,” About His Prison Experience

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Ai Weiwei’s 81 days in detention in 2011 is the inspiration for his latest work,

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Northern_Clips‘s insight:

Ai Weiwei’s 81 days in detention in 2011 is the inspiration for his latest work, “Dumbass,” a song he wrote with music by rocker/artist Zuoxiao Zuzhou. The accompanying video was released minutes ago, in which Ai recreates scenes from his imprisonment. “He also portrays fantasies he imagines flitting through the guards’ minds,” reports the NY Times. The cinematography is by Christopher Doyle, who has worked with the likes of Wong Kar-wai. The song is also on Soundcloud and will be included in a forthcoming album called The Divine Comedy, to be released June 22.

You can download the video here.

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Cameron Falls – Ingraham Trail, Northwest Territories

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Published on May 21, 2013

Wanted to test out my new Panasonic HC-X920 last weekend and figured I’d go check out Cameron Falls where the spring thaw is ongoing, making for some interesting snow and ice shots.
If you’d like to see more videos like this, please feel free to comment with a suggestion.

Cameron Falls Trail is located within Hidden Lake Territorial Park, on the Ingraham Trail. It is approximately 47 km east of Yellowknife.

http://www.iti.gov.nt.ca/tourismparks/parks/parks/cameron_falls_trail.shtml

 

 

Northern_Clips‘s insight:

Cameron Falls are always interesting… anytime of the year…. Video by Cale Frombach http://frombach.ca/

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May 2013 Lafferty being put into the water at Liard River

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Published on May 19, 2013

Ferry got hung up on mud at the landing..they had to slowly push one side down with cats ..then push the other side to slowly inch it down …after 2 days they finally made it into the water.

 

 

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Northern_Clips‘s insight:

A sure sign of summer in the Northwest Territories

 

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See on www.youtube.com

Income Outcome By Miranda Currie

Income Outcome By Miranda Currie
January 2012  NWT MLA Bob Bromley read this poem in  the Legegislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories. P.O. Box 1320
Yellowknife, NT X1A 2L9
Phone: 867-669-2272
Fax: 867-873-0276
bob_bromley@gov.nt.ca
MR. BROMLEY in NWT’s Hansard of March 12, 2013
“…I’d like to turn to the main focus of my comments today, and I’d like to begin by acknowledging again, Ms. Miranda Currie, who’s in the gallery today. Thanks for coming out, Miranda. I’d like to read a poem that Ms. Currie has written to describe her experiences in seeking disability income support, and it’s obviously germane because of the Auditor General’s focus, and I know the Minister is focusing on this situation right now as well. Once again, thanks to Miranda for graciously sharing her personal story through the art of this poetry.
But, first, a little bit of background. Ms. Currie suffered a very serious head injury in an accident in November 2011. She later suffered multiple injuries again, head injuries, as a result of the ill effects of her original injury. To this day, she is continuing to strive to regain her health. She’s a very spunky person and I know she will achieve that. However, she has been unable to carry on her daily life in a normal way. She has been in and out of hospitals and has received extensive neurological treatment since then, and she does suffer impairment of her speech and many motor skills. Miranda was self- employed before the accident, and she must now rely on public income support to meet her basic subsistence needs. She lives very modestly. Her ordeal with income security has hardly been a positive contribution in her effort to regain her health, and that’s the topic today.
Just a few of the difficulties that she has experienced in trying to access income assistance include:
• A case worker refusal to provide accommodation assistance based on the subjective judgement that she lives in substandard housing.
• Receipts to document her rental, electrical and fuel costs were obtained with great physical difficulties and expense and visiting offices to obtain stamped and certified copies.
• Income assistance staff say they have lost the receipts she has supplied to their offices. This has happened four times. Imagine if you were saddled with this situation.
• Despite severe mobility problems and risk of re-injury, she has repeatedly been told she must come to the income assistance office for interviews, which could easily be conducted over the phone.
• She has been refused reimbursement of costs for loans received from friends in the interim to pay her fuel, power and living costs, and given the explanation that those are considered gifts. Nice of them to make that decision on behalf of her friends.
• Treatment that lacks compassion and sensitivity to the realities of her situation, again, not a single instance, such as a caseworker hanging up on her after saying I’ll see you tomorrow when Ms. Currie has said she is physically unable to attend appointments due to the effects of her injuries.
• And, finally, a late payment of support have at times left her huddled in her bed to stay warm, unable to pay oil bills and living in a home well below zero. We know what this winter has been like.
That’s enough background. Her words really do speak for themselves, and once again, I want to express my appreciation to Miranda Currie for her willingness to share this very personal story…” From –
http://www.assembly.gov.nt.ca/_live/documents/content/hn130312.pdf
See also
Poverty and social services in the NWT on the eve of devolution
By George Lessard| March 8, 2013

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RAIPON indigenous peoples association new president

Arctic anthropology

For those interested, the Russian Indigenous Peoples Association (RAIPON) got a new president a week ago, at a very important time in the organisation’s biography, because it had been closed down for formal reasons by Russian authorities late last year.

Now elections for the presidency had been held in Salekhard, the capital of my prime fieldsite Yamal-Nenets Okrug, which always has been very loyal to the Russian government. It is remarkable that almost all the RAIPON presidents so far, since Perestroika, came from West Siberia’s oil and gas extracting provinces: Eremei Aipin (Khanty writer), Sergei Khariutschi (Nenets Politician), and now Grigori Ledkov (Nenets born in Europe but politically acting on behalf of Yamal). I think this shows how much indigenous empowerment in general is connected to extractive industries and development on indigenous lands.

I have known the new president, Grigori Ledkov, since 1999, and found that he can also wear…

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“If research doesn’t surprise you, it’s not worth the research” Julie Cruikshank

Arctic anthropology

I would like to share with you some of the things we learned from Julie Cruikshank and other elders from the Yukon Territory to better understand oral history from the North. To search for surprising insights, to be open to challenges to our conventional perceptions, that was Julie’s most important advice to us.

Her talk centred on stories about glaciers that challenge the nature versus culture dichotomy science is so preoccupied with. Why did she invite us to dismiss this divide? Does it not serve us well at least to keep the humanities and social sciences distinct from the natural sciences?

We know from our own fieldwork experiences that people who live in close connection with the local environment don’t draw a clear line between nature and culture. They interact with natural phenomena in a very social way and they know very well that the beings we call nature display…

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