Better Dead Than Alive? ‘The Inconvenient Indian’ Takes a Seriously Funny Look at Native History

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Thomas King’s The Inconvenient Indian is an unvarnished look at the cruelty and cluelessness of the colonial mentality and Indians’ role

See on indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com

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Arviat Nunavut’s Susan Aglukark keeps dreaming of home

See on Scoop.itInuit Nunangat Stories

The Arviat-raised singer and songwriter Susan Aglukark may have now spent most of her life living outside Nunavut, but she says the homesickness has never left her.

And that feeling inspired the name of her newest album, Dreaming of Home, a collection of Christmas and family songs that make up the three-time Juno award-winner’s seventh album.

Dreaming of Home is a series of songs which aren’t all Christmas-themed, but they’re all linked to home, family and the holidays — three things Aglukark said she cherishes.

“I’m always homesick for home,” she said in an interview from her Toronto-area residence. “But Christmastime is when it’s that much more poignant.”

There are the Christmas standard carols: “Silent Night,” “Do you hear what I hear?” and “Oh come Emmanuel,” sung in both English and Inuktitut.

Northern_Clips‘s insight:

"… A newly-launched Christmas campaign through Aglukark’s Arctic Rose Fund sent its first box of non-perishable food to the Nuatsivik food bank in Iqaluit last week.

Aglukark plans to send a box each week from between now and Christmas. The Arctic Rose Fund, named after her popular album and song, Arctic Rose, is accepting food donations and paying to have them shipped north.

The goal is to encourage and assist all Nunavut’s food banks to become registered — only Iqaluit’s food bank is regitered currently — so the fund can help food banks feed families over the holidays, Aglukark said.

“The need is there all the time,” she acknowledged,” but we’re mailing and shipping these packages to guarantee they get there [for Christmas].”

Aglukark’s album Dreaming of Home is now available at stores Target and Walmart, through iTunes, or by contacting info@susanaglukark.com…"

 

See on www.nunatsiaqonline.ca

Audiour – Share Audio, Simply

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“The Easiest Way to Share Audio”

Northern_Clips‘s insight:

"The Easiest Way to Share Audio"

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Remembrance Day in Yellowknife1994: In Flanders Fields and An Ode to Valor

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Published on Nov 10, 2013

Remembrance day 1994. In Flanders Fields (set to John McCrae’s poem by Bill Gilday) and An Ode to Valor (lyrics Bob MacQuarrie, music Bill Gilday) with Yellowknife Youth Choir and men’s chorus directed by Bill Gilday.

 

 

Northern_Clips‘s insight:

Published on Nov 10, 2013

"… Remembrance day 1994. In Flanders Fields (set to John McCrae’s poem by Bill Gilday) and An Ode to Valor (lyrics Bob MacQuarrie, music Bill Gilday) with Yellowknife Youth Choir and men’s chorus directed by Bill Gilday…."

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Inuit Nunangat Stories

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Arctic, Circumpolar stories curated by @Northern_Clips [Full story? Click on headline]

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NWT News

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News from Canada’s Northwest Territories curated by @Northern_Clips [Full story? Click on headline]

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More revenues in #NWT #Heritage Fund #YZF & #FtSmith #NWTpoli #Devolution

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“… Echoing calls from Fort Smith earlier last month, Yellowknifers made a hardline push for at least half of resource revenues garnered through devolution to be put into the Heritage Fund for safekeeping for future generations at last week’s public meeting. … 

Though Miltenberger’s plan is to put 5 per cent of that $42 million into the NWT’s new Heritage Fund, saving the rest for infrastructure and debt repayment, residents attending the meeting in Yellowknife requested anywhere between half and 100 per cent of the revenues from non-renewables to be put aside for future generations who won’t be able to benefit from those resources.

Yellowknife’s Frame Lake MLA Wendy Bisaro was one of them. Though she agreed with Miltenberger’s intent to ensure no resource revenues are allocated for programs and services – for which the government already invests $1.4 billion annually – she said a 5 per cent investment for the future was disappointing.

“In my view, we should be placing a minimum of 25 per cent of our anticipated resource revenues into the Heritage Fund, and it should be so stated in legislation, not in regulations which are easily changed by government without any discussion with, or input from, the public,” she said in legislature last week….”

Northern_Clips‘s insight:

"…Residents in Fort Smith also called for at least 25 per cent to be put towards the fund, with the preference of 100 per cent, as is done in Norway, whose Heritage Fund currently boasts around $730 billion. […] The department has two communities left on its budget consultation tour. Miltenberger and his Finance staff will be in Inuvik on Nov. 12 and Norman Wells on Nov. 13…."

See on norj.ca

Have book will travel

See on Scoop.itNWT News

Danielle Sachs
Northern News Services
Published Thursday, October 31, 2013

SOMBA K’E/YELLOWKNIFE 
There are many stories in the North and just as many storytellers. Whether in spoken word, short story collections, Internet blogs or in-depth essays that examine culture, heritage and experience, Northerners can tell their stories. But where can they go for advice?

Northern_Clips‘s insight:

RT @northern_clips: One-on-One #Online/email #Writing #Mentorships $20/hr by @NorthWords members
http://ow.ly/qiXuF via @LaurieSarkadi
"…The online mentoring program begins Monday and runs until the end of March. Anyone interested can sign for up to an hour of each program.

Thirty-minute workshops with guest authors have been held at previous Writer’s Festivals. Pool noticed that often, participants just wanted to bounce their ideas off someone, hence the online mentorship program.

“One of the continuing challenges we face as writers is it tends to be a solitary activity,” said Pool…."

See on www.nnsl.com

Pioneers of northern radio

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When Yellowknife was founded more than 75 years ago, its only reliable means of communications was run out of a tent with two soldiers and a radio.

Early in September of 1937, the Army was ordered to the new town to establish “RC Sigs Station Yellowknife.” It was the government’s answer to communications problems in the North. The station would become the largest and busiest in the Northwest Territories, according to Maj. Terry Buehl, the man currently in charge of military signals in Yellowknife with Joint Task Force (North).

The Yellowknife station was part of a vast network of stations manned by soldiers from the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals. The first was built in 1922 in Dawson City, Yukon, replacing an unreliable telegraph line and a limited post service.

On Friday, the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals celebrated the 110th anniversary of military communications in Canada. In Yellowknife, Buehl and his signallers took part by participating in a world-wide radio exercise.

 

See also

Northwest Territories and Yukon Radio System History Project http://ow.ly/qqKVi

Northern_Clips‘s insight:

"…The Canadian military was the first in the Commonwealth to create a dedicated signals unit. Military signallers in Yellowknife today can trace their roots back to the formation of the Canadian Signalling Corps in 1903.

The army provided radio communications for Yellowknife for 21 years, until 1958, when CBC took over the station…."
‘…The story of the NWT&Y Radio System is a virtually unknown saga in the history of the development of northern Canada. The contributions of the men who staffed the stations are largely unheralded. In his post-script to the official history, WO1 Cal Vince says:

"Northerners will also remember Signals primarily as magistrates, Airways and Transportation agents, acting minions of the law and prime movers in community affairs. It is the unmistakeable fact that the fine reputation built by the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals during 37 eventful years of service in the north country was not the result of the efforts of one, two or even three individuals, but rather the results of the combined efforts of every officer and man who served on this now non-existent arm of the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals."

These are not the normal roles of soldiers on active service. But there in the Canadian northland they were engaged in unusual circumstances and eventful times. Not only was Canada’s northern frontier and its resources in the early stages of exploration and development, but the science, technology and practical applications of global telecommunications and air transportation were also probing new frontiers. The Royal Canadian Corps of Signals was asked by the Government of Canada to step into the breach and fill the void in long-distance telecommunication to serve those industries and the embryonic communities in the northern territories. In the process the Signallers found themselves, perforce, fulfilling duties far beyond anything they had learned at the School of Signals in Vimy Barracks. In enthusiasm, ability, dedication and inventiveness they were not found wanting. In the nearly four decades (1923-59) that their System operated they left behind them a proud and impressive legacy…."
Northwest Territories and Yukon Radio System History Project http://ow.ly/qqKVi

See on nnsl.com

First exhibition at MoMA wholly dedicated to sound as a form of artistic … – Art Daily

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First exhibition at MoMA wholly dedicated to sound as a form of artistic …

See on www.artdaily.org

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