“Media and reconciliation” is a Truth and Reconciliation Commission call to journalist’s action

The TRC report urges Canadian journalism programs and media schools to “require education for all students on the history of Aboriginal peoples.”

ITK’s Natan Obed scolds reporters

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau looks on as Natan Obed, President of the ITK, speaks during a press conference in Iqaluit, Nunavut “…Questions moved to the SNC-Lavalin affair, which has been dominating the news cycle in Ottawa for the last month. The shift in focus, away from human rights abuses experienced by Inuit, prompted Obed to scold reporters and remind media of its role in reconciliation.
Full transcript of his comments below:
“I think something that the media should reflect on is that throughout all of this, there has always been more important stories. And the stories of human rights abuses to Inuit. Every time there is something that happens, such as an apology today, there are other stories in the world.
But the fact that media passed right by the people whose human rights abuses were not told by the media for decades to other stories of the day is still a reflection on the work that needs to happen in reconciliation. The Inuit who were apologized today matter. This story matters. It is a Canadian story.
And I recognize that there are other media stories that matter as well. But I do hope in the future there can be more respect given to the place and time and the people who deserve to have their story told. And the media have a strong role to play to tell it.”
Obed is president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, a national non-profit organization that represents 53 communities in the north.
“Media and reconciliation” is a subsection in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s calls to action. The TRC report urges Canadian journalism programs and media schools to “require education for all students on the history of Aboriginal peoples.”….”
https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2019/03/08/natan-obed-media-snc-lavalin_a_23688192/

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“Everyone is waking up”: Tanya Tagaq on fighting for justice and singing for Björk

“….Protest music has found an avant-garde champion in the formidable grunts and howls of Inuk throat singer Tanya Tagaq. April Clare Welsh finds out how the First Nations activist and Björk collaborator is using her platform to shine a light on Canada’s dark history […]Tagaq believes that online activism like the virtual mob that flocked to Standing Rock has become “absolutely crucial” in the global fight for Indigenous rights. “Indigenous people have been fighting for the planet for a very, very long time,” she says, “but everyone is waking up to it now. You see these elders engaging in peaceful protests and getting pepper-sprayed by billionaire companies that just want more money – in 2016 that’s just unacceptable. Too many people are awake to accept that behaviour.”[…] Tagaq herself is a survivor of Canada’s notorious Residential School System, a forced assimilation programme which operated from the late 19th century right until 1996, taking Indigenous children away from their communities and placing them in boarding schools around the country. Around 6,000 students died during the residential schools’ existence, and sexual and physical abuse was endemic – though Tagaq emphasises that she doesn’t carry personal pain from her time at high school: “I wouldn’t want to take anything away from the people who suffered the massive indignities themselves.”….”
Tanya Tagaq – Retribution

Tanya Tagaq “Uja” and “Umingmak” (live) — Polaris Music Prize 2014

#Inuktitut #Radio #JOBS in #KUUJUAQ #Nunavik #Quebec

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Inuktitut JOB OPPORTUNITIES- IN KUUJUAQ, Nunavik, Quebec: Taqramiut Nipinqat Inc. the Inuit Radio and Television Company of Nunavik, “… invites interested and motivated persons to apply for the positions of Radio Producers (2 positions) for our radio production center in Kuujjuaq.
We are looking for candidates who are outgoing and motivated to work as Radio Producers.
The candidates who don’t have experience will have the opportunity to work alongside a radio production trainer who will teach them how to use the radio equipment and create their own radio shows which will be broadcast on the Taqramiut Nipingat’s regional radio network.
Radio Producers (2 positions)
Under the supervision of the Office Operations Manager, the Radio Producers prepare radio programs and segments for broadcast related to traditional and cultural issues. The main tasks related to these positions are to identify story and program ideas, operate production equipment, read, host, announce and interview on and off air.
The candidates that we are looking for have an interest in the field of communication and are willing to learn the profession. You must be fluent in Inuktitut. Experience in the field of communication and knowledge of another language (English or French) would be definite assets. Training will be provided during employment.
Please submit your resume before 5:00pm on May 25th 2015 to:
Julie Grenier
Office Manager
Taqramiut Nipingat Inc
PO Box 360
Kuujjuaq, Quebec
JOM ICO
Tel: (819) 964-1999 (207)
Fax:(819)964-1555
E-mail: jgrenier@taqramiut.qc.ca ….”
* Application Forms are also available upon request.
Web: http://www.tni-rtn.com/
Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/TaqramiutNipingat

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Features | Inuktitut Tusaalanga

A glossary/mini-dictionary containing 1400+ Inuktitut terms accessible either in romanized or syllabic Inuktitut. 20+ dialogues with full audio and optional English definitions An index to the Inuktitut grammar concepts.

via Features | Inuktitut Tusaalanga.

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The Tale of Uummannaq: a small isolated Greenlandic village in need of solutions in the times of climate & societal change.

Via Scoop.itNunavut

Uploaded by UummannaqMusic on Mar 19, 2012

Galya Morrell’s short documentary The Tale of Uummannaq, highlights a small isolated Greenlandic village in need of solutions in the times of climate and societal change.

Uummannaq – a heart-shaped island in Northern Greenland – is referred by many as the “Heart of the Arctic.” Today, like many other little settlements in the Far North, its culture is at risk of disappearing. The ancient ways of life that had survived for millennia are now disintegrating along with the disappearing ice.

In the old days, the sea ice was the center of a healthy living community. Everything — food, clothing, legends, and moral values — came from the sea ice. Songs were composed and stories were told beside seals’ breathing holes. Now, as the ice vanishes, people feel that they are rapidly losing the “ground” beneath their feet.

Join us in this rare opportunity to look into the lives and the disappearing culture of the Inuit as they take part in Uummannami Nipi (Uummannaq Music – in Kalallisut), their community-based yet far-reaching initiative in Northern Greenland whose goals are to protect and support the indigenous dog-sledding hunting culture, preserve the old traditions of Inuit music, dance and storytelling, and thereby prevent the epidemic of suicides among the region’s youth brought about by the stresses of abrupt climate and societal change.

Arguably the world’s northernmost stage on the drifting ice, Uummannami Nipi functions as a collaboration of native hunters, international artists and local children that aims to revive the spirit of the community and protect the unique Greenlandic values that are disintegrating along with vanishing ice and the advance of “consumer civilization.”

Via www.youtube.com

Sam Tutanuak “Back In ’58” Official Music Video

Via Scoop.itNunavut

Uploaded by samtutanuakmusic on May 13, 2011 One of the great new voices of the Canadian north, Sam Tutanuak. This song is about those affected by the native relocation projects of the past
Via www.youtube.com

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