First Ongoing Tracking Study of the Opinions of Residents the 🇨🇦 & 🇺🇸 North

First Ongoing Tracking Study of the Opinions of Residents Across the North screan-cap_1800DataPath logosmaller

 

The First Ongoing Tracking Study of the Opinions of Residents the 🇨🇦 & 🇺🇸 North “… DataPath Systems is a Yukon based market research company. We are recruiting Northerners to be part of our online panel. What this means is that every few months or so we will email a link to a short survey for you to complete.
On some of the surveys there are prize draws you can enter. Being on our email panel means we won’t telephone you and interrupt your dinner.
You can complete the surveys on your own time, when it is convenient for you. It also means that your opinions on Northern issues will be heard. As always, all the information you provide is completely confidential.
Yes, I live in The North (Alaska, Yukon, N.W.T., Nunavut) and I want my opinion heard…”
http://www.datapathsystems.net/
DataPath Systems
phone: 844-415-4601
fax: 575-532-9627
email: info@datapathsystems.net
mail address: Box 2180 Marsh Lake, Y0B 1Y2, Yukon Territory

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@Northern_Clips Followers 1,999

 

@Northern_Clips Followers 1,999 screan-cap_1206

 

@Northern_Clips Followers 1,999 https://twitter.com/Northern_Clips

The Design and Development of Digital Return Platforms for Northern Indigenous Heritage (PDF)

Digital Return Platforms for Northern Indigenous Heritage screan-cap_1062

Executive Summary

“… Digital return technologies offer Indigenous communities a means of repatriating objects and knowledge gathered from their ancestors as part of earlier colonial endeavors. Many third party institutions such as museums, universities, and government heritage agencies, retain possession of these collections because of the perceived impracticality of returning them to source communities.
The concept of digital repatriation or “digital return” has emerged as a means of rebuilding relationships between source communities and third party institutions through the transfer of knowledge and objects in digital form. In this way, digital return systems, such as online archives, electronic atlases and digital databases, are excellent examples of disruptive technologies.
The idea of disruptive technologies was first popularized by Clayton Christensen in his 1997 book “The Innovator’s Dilemma”. Disruptive technologies are technological innovations that upset networks supporting the existing state of affairs. Digital return acts as a disruptive technology because it disrupts established institutional models for archiving, accessing, and interpreting objects and cultural knowledge.
Paradoxically, digital return also disrupts traditional Indigenous networks that support how objects and cultural knowledge are accessed and circulated by making them freely available on the public Internet . Resolving this paradox requires that we identify and address existing knowledge gaps in both the sociocultural and technological sides of digital return.
A three-part scoping review of Indigenous digital return projects in regions of the North American and European Arctic was undertaken to: a) identify the extent and objectives of academic, government, and community-led digital return projects; b) characterize the digital return methodologies currently used in arctic communities; c) identify the issues and challenges facing digital return projects within the study area; and d) draw attention to heritage initiatives that are grass roots and community led.
The methods used in this study include: a) bibliometric analysis of electronic databases; b) online surveys of digital return projects; and c) a case study of community-led heritage organizations and their projects. …”
PDF http://www.idees-ideas.ca/sites/default/files/sites/default/uploads/general/2016/2016-sshrc-ksg-dawson_0.pdf

#SamKnows #Yellowknife Broadband Measurement Project #NWT #CRTC #Whitebox

SamKnows #Yellowknife Broadband Measurement Project #NWT #CRTC #Whitebox
https://youtu.be/st8OX9ihAUM


“… Dear GEORGE
Thank you for participating in the Canadian Broadband Measurement Project.
Unfortunately, your unit has not reported any data since 10-Dec-16, and we are wondering if the unit is still connected.
To resolve the problem: Ensure your Whitebox is connected to your modem/router. Reboot the Whitebox by either switching the power off and on or briefly unplugging the device.
Please send us an email to […] and we will confirm if the problem is fixed.
We really do need your consistent support for the long term, so please switch your test box back on today. As part of the SamKnows panel, we give you access to your own data via an online reporting system, and also a monthly email report card to allow you to compare performance and communicate with your ISP.
Thank you for your support.
Kind regards,
SamKnows …”
“… Join our Canadian campaign… Sign up with us today to accurately measure your broadband performance
The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) and SamKnows have established the ‘Measuring Broadband Canada’ program in order to provide Canadian citizens with reliable and accurate data concerning broadband provision across the country.
Anyone who would like to be part of this project just needs to sign up. It might be worth reading the requirements before doing so just to make sure you’re eligible to join!
On signing up, volunteers will receive a purpose-built broadband measurement unit, also known as a SamKnows Whitebox. The Whitebox is easy to install; once it has been plugged into the existing modem / router then it is good to go. Volunteers will also be able to see their own data from their broadband connection using a purpose-built SamKnows dashboard.
Please note, not everyone who registers will necessarily receive a SamKnows Whitebox. We do want to thank everyone for signing up and for working together to make Canadian broadband better!…”
https://www.measuringbroadbandcanada.com/

“…What is the Broadband Measurement Project?
In 2015, the CRTC launched a project to objectively measure broadband Internet performance, including actual connection speeds, in Canadian homes. It collaborated in this innovative project, a first for Canada, with major Canadian Internet service providers (ISPs) and SamKnows, a UK-based company that has built a global Internet measurement platform that spans five continents.
The data, collected from approximately 5,000 Canadian volunteers, from across the country, will inform the CRTC’s future broadband policy-making.
The data will also provide Canadians with a greater understanding of whether Internet services from participating ISPs are delivered at the advertised speeds and allow ISPs to improve their networks to better serve existing customers, and promote products to potential new customers.
The key output of the project is the annual report, developed and reviewed by all participants.
How is data collected for the Broadband Measurement Project?
A device known as a Whitebox is connected to a volunteer’s home modem or router and monitors the broadband performance when no one is using the Internet connection. This performance data is made available to the volunteer via a Web portal and is also available to the CRTC and the ISP providing the service. …”
http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/internet/proj.htm

Native American, Alaska Native, Inuit & First Nations Traditional Values, Beliefs, and Knowledge Survey Launched

“Native American, Alaska Native, Inuit & First Nations Traditional Values, Beliefs, and Knowledge Survey Launched”

Original montage for the 2007 Deh Cho Drum “Year in Review” issue For my employer, http://nnsl.com

Original montage for the 2007 Deh Cho Drum “Year in Review” issue
For my employer, http://nnsl.com

———- Forwarded message ———-

From: Andrew Hund <axh69@cwru.edu>
Date: 20 May 2014 10:05
Subject: Press Release — Traditional Values, Beliefs, and Knowledge Survey

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: 5/20/2014

News Release from Andrew Hund, M.A., Ph.D.

“Native American, Alaska Native, Inuit & First Nations Traditional Values, Beliefs, and Knowledge Survey Launched”

(Al Ain, UAE) — A new research study is being conducted by Andrew Hund. This questionnaire is designed to gather general information about indigenous and non-indigenous people views of values, beliefs, and knowledge. The study is designed to establish a baseline of Native American, Alaska Native, and Canadian first Nations traditional values and beliefs. The questionnaire focuses on participant’s interactions with others, as well as their perception of subsistence, emotions, and health and illness.

Participants’ responses are anonymous. The information collected will be added with the opinions of others that complete this questionnaire and following the data collection, an analysis will be performed.The results of this study will be used for educational purposes. There is no risk to you from participating in this survey; this survey is voluntary and you may quit at anytime. The questionnaire takes between 5-10 minutes to complete. The study will be conducted until at least August 2014.

The anonymous survey can be accessed at:
http://www.surveymethods.com/EndUser.aspx?F2D6BAA3FBB5AFA1F1

———- Forwarded message ends -30- ———-

The corner of Sainte Catherine’s and Atwater and the Pepsi Forum. | Flickr – Photo Sharing!

 

“… The corner of Sainte Catherine's and Atwater and the Pepsi Forum. The famous Montreal Forum, where the Montreal Canadiens used to play until the Molson Centre (now the Bell Centre) opened in 1996, got gutted and transformed into a shopping and entertainment complex in the late 1990s. …”

The corner of Sainte Catherine’s and Atwater and the Pepsi Forum. | Flickr – Photo Sharing!.

The corner of Sainte Catherine’s and Atwater and the Forum.
“… The famous Montreal Forum, where the Montreal Canadiens used to play [hockey] until the Molson Centre (now the Bell Centre) opened in 1996, got gutted and transformed into a shopping and entertainment complex in the late 1990s. …”

Canada’s Best Small Towns – Rankin Inlet Nunavut, Ft Smith NWT & Yukon’s Dawson City

[excerpt from The Great Canadian Bucket List]

Nunavut – RANKIN INLET Credit: Rankin Inlet

With fewer than 2500 people, the hamlet of Rankin Inlet is the second most populous community in Nunavut. Although Iqaluit defeated Rankin to become Nunavut’s capital, Rankin Inlet is well known for its artist community, particularly in ceramics, print, carvings, casting and painting. Rankin serves as the business and transportation hub of the Kivalliq region, and offers services absent from many northern communities. These include cell phone service, cable, satellite, recreational facilities (golf, volleyball, indoor arenas and outdoor fields). The surrounding landscape is largely untouched, with the Iqalugaarjuup Nunanga Territorial Historic Park a popular spot for hiking, fishing and bird watching. The community comes together for craft shows, square dances, Pakalluk Time (a town festival) and Christmas activities.

Northwest Territories: FORT SMITH 

Fort Smith

Fort Smith a multicultural community surrounded by boreal forest, with a population of 2500.   The town sits at the gateway of Wood Buffalo National Park, the largest national park in Canada, and one for the Bucket List.  Townsfolk enjoy summer activities amongst pristine beauty, including kayaking, hiking, biking and golfing.  For rafters, the Slave River presents some of the most challenging rapids on the continent.  Sitting on the banks of the Slave River, community spirit is stoked with the South Slave Friendship Festival in August and the Wood Buffalo Winter Frolic in March, attracting artists and musicians from around the territory.  Visitors are also drawn to the Forth Smith’s Northern Life Museum and Cultural Centre.

Yukon: DAWSON CITY

Dawson City

Dawson City was once the largest city west of Winnipeg and north of San Francisco, known as the Paris of the North.   The 1898 Klondike Gold Rush brought tens of thousands of prospectors to this small town, most of which returned penniless, their fate immortalized in the legendary poems of Robert Service.  Today, with a population of around 1300, the well-preserved town is home to several national historical sites, and draws thousands of tourists visiting Yukon or Alaska. Visitors can still pan for gold, or visit heritage homes and museums.  Dawson City’s Downtown Hotel is also home to the Sour Toe Cocktail, the most infamous drink of the North (and on The Great Canadian Bucket List)

 

via Canada’s Best Small Towns – The Great Canadian Bucket List.

Bell Mobility to appeal ruling in 911 lawsuit – North – CBC News

Bell Mobility to appeal ruling in 911 lawsuit – North – CBC News.

Bell Mobility says the company plans to appeal a Northwest Territories Supreme Court ruling on a matter he believes “hadn’t even been certified for trial.”

On Friday, Justice Ron Veale ruled Bell is liable to nearly 30,000 cellphone users in the N.W.T., Yukon and Nunavut who paid for 911 services they didn’t receive.

The class-action lawsuit dates back to 2007, when Yellowknifers James Anderson and his son Samuel first filed the case. They complained Bell Mobility was charging customers 75 cents a month — or $9 a year — for a service that isn’t available.

A 911 operator isn’t available anywhere in the territories, except Whitehorse. Instead, residents call a 10-digit number for emergency services.

 

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2012 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

600 people reached the top of Mt. Everest in 2012. This blog got about 1,900 views in 2012. If every person who reached the top of Mt. Everest viewed this blog, it would have taken 3 years to get that many views.

Click here to see the complete report.

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SERNNoCa Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada videos

Subject: SERNNoCa [Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada] videos

For more information about the Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada, go to http://dl1.yukoncollege.yk.ca/sernnoca/ .

Here are all their current videos

SERNNoCa uploaded a video

2 days ago

4 views

Presentation given by Jerald Sabin, University of Toronto, during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Yellowknife, No…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa uploaded a video

2 days ago

12 views

Presentation given by Reanna Mohamed, Yukon Anti-Poverty Coalition, as a part of a panel during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summ…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa uploaded a video

3 days ago

9 views

Presentation given by Frances Abele, Carleton University, during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Yellowknife, Nor…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa uploaded a video

3 days ago

6 views

Presentation given by Brenda Parlee, University of Alberta, during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Yellowknife, N…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa uploaded a video

3 days ago

11 views

Presentation given by Michael Toye, Canadian Social Economy Hub and Canadian Community Economic Development Network (CCEDNet), during the Northern …

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

33 views

Presentation given by Margaret Johnston during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Whitehorse, Yukon from November 2n…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

29 views

Presentation given by Ed McKenna, Nunavut Anti-Poverty Secretariat during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Whiteho…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

56 views

Presentation given by Brendan Reimer from the Canadian Community Economic Development Network during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

43 views

Presentation given by Jerald Sabin, University of Toronto, during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Whitehorse, Yuk…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

60 views

Presentation given by David Natcher, University of Saskatchewan, during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Whitehors…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

68 views

Presentation given by Nick Falvo, Carleton University during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Whitehorse, Yukon fr…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

69 views

Presentation given by Chris Southcott, Project Director of the Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada (SERNNoCa) during the Northern Su…

SERNNoCa posted

9 months ago

For more information about the Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada, go to http://dl1.yukoncollege.yk.ca/sernnoca/ .

GEORGE LESSARD
Information, Communications and Media Specialist
Spécialiste en l’information, communications et media

Yellowknife, Northwest Territories
X1A 2J1, Canada
Yellowknife Cell # (867) 445-9193
E-mail: mediamentorATgmailDOTcom
Website mediamentor.ca
Twitter Feed on Northern & First Nations Issues
Twitter Feed on Journalism & Media Issues
Twitter Feed on Community Radio Worldwide
Member:
Canadian Artists Representation / le Front des artistes canadiens
Canadian Artists Representation Copyright Collective

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