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W.C. Fields speaks Inuktitut? – The Diner Sketch – YouTube

W.C. Fields – The Diner Sketch – YouTube.

 http://youtu.be/yOHGr8r5Cs4?t=4m10s

“…Northern friends – anyone notice a very peculiar word about halfway through this sketch?…”

Distinctively…. “qallunaaq”
and not a bad pronunciation to my ear…
for Hollywood
especially at that date…
http://youtu.be/yOHGr8r5Cs4?t=4m10s
Distinctively…. at 4:19
and not a bad pronunciation to my ear…
for Hollywood
especially at that date…
Then W.C. Fields repeats it and says
“… I haven’t been called that for two days…”

“…To her colleagues at the college where Kublu works, she is, we hope, an equal, with a professional competence extending beyond her particular role as instructor of interpretation and translation. To her students, she is a role model, one who has attained a balance between two worlds. To herself . . . well, she knows she can never be the kind of Inuk her elders were, but, with all due respect, she doesn’t want to be. And she never could be a “qallunaaq” (white person). …”

http://www.nunavut.com/nunavut99/english/our.html

Blue Future: Maude Barlow Event in Yellowknife | NWT Chapter – Council of Canadians

Blue Future: Maude Barlow Event in Yellowknife | NWT Chapter – Council of Canadians.

http://cocnwt.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/1236648_233632970123068_952471679_n.jpg

 

Blue Future: Protecting Water for People and the Planet Forever
Featuring Maude Barlow
Wednesday, October 30 (7:00 – 9:00 pm)
Northern United Place
5403 Franklin Avenue, Yellowknife (map)

Invite your friends to the Facebook event.

Please join the Council of Canadians’ NWT Chapter for a thought-provoking evening with Council of Canadians’ National Chairperson Maude Barlow, one of the world’s foremost experts on water.

Maude will be discussing the world’s growing water crisis and the fight to protect our most precious resource. Drawing from her recently released book, Blue Future, Maude will bring the global context to unfolding water issues in the Northwest Territories.

Copies of Maude’s new book, Blue Future, will be available for purchase, and Maude will be signing books after her presentation.

About Maude Barlow

Maude Barlow is the National Chairperson of the Council of Canadians and chairs the board of Washington-based Food and Water Watch. She is a board member of the San Francisco–based International Forum on Globalization and a Councillor with the Hamburg-based World Future Council.

Maude is the recipient of eleven honorary doctorates as well as many awards, including the 2005 Right Livelihood Award (known as the “Alternative Nobel”), the 2005 Lannan Foundation Cultural Freedom Fellowship Award, the Citation of Lifetime Achievement at the 2008 Canadian Environment Awards, the 2009 Earth Day Canada Outstanding Environmental Achievement Award, the 2009 Planet in Focus Eco Hero Award, and the 2011 EarthCare Award, the highest international honour of the Sierra Club (US).

In 2008/2009, she served as Senior Advisor on Water to the 63rd President of the United Nations General Assembly and was a leader in the campaign to have water recognized as a human right by the UN. She is also the author of dozens of reports, as well as 17 books, including her latest, Blue Future: Protecting Water For People And The Planet Forever.

Decolonizing the digital North: why Inuit need better broadband, now.

See on Scoop.itNunavut Stories

Global Native Networks – Investigating Indigenous Use of Digital Technology Around the World

[excerpt]

“The cultural survival of marginalized peoples may soon depend (if it does not already) on an ability and willingness among the otherwise defenseless to plug into – literally and figuratively – transnational lobby networks… More to the point, if internet lobbying is a key strategy for defense against unwanted mega-projects, forced resettlement, environmental degradation or policies of linguistic and cultural assimilation, then those who exist on the margins of technology will also have marginal hopes for cultural survival.” 2005, Niezen, p. 548-9.

How can a place so over-researched and endlessly problematized as Nunavut be so under-supported and information-starved at the same time?

This question haunts my every interaction in the North. Residents of Nunavut are accustomed to being researched and scrutinized by Southern academics and bureaucrats, with relatively little to show for it. Why – in what I have argued is a Canadian “welfare colony” – have government funds not gone further to improve the livelihood and well-being of Nunavummiut, particularly the Inuit?

The following few posts will address this question by detailing (infra-)structural factors that impede more rapid development in Nunavut, particularly as these factors pertain to my focus – indigenous technology use. I hope to interrogate why things are the way they are, to trace policy and investment decisions as much as I can from my little post up here in Igloolik, where few upper-level decision makers dare to venture.

If you know anything about the legacy of Anthropology at Rice University, you might guess that my academic training weighed heavily on theory. And you would be correct. The literature that introduced me to indigenous media focused largely on the politics of representation; it has remained sexy in the last few decades – ever since Sol Worth and Jon Adair put cameras in the hands of the Navajo – to ponder if Western technologies bring with them inherently Western conceptions of time, space and story-telling. If they commit an epistemic violence that flattens alternative ways of knowing and telling. These esoteric questions seduced me, led me to this topic in the first place.

In the same vein, I thought this year-long project would bring me face-to-face with what Faye Ginsburg first called the “Faustian Bargain” of indigenous media:

Indigenous and minority people have faced a kind of Faustian dilemma. On one hand, they are finding new modes of expressing indigenous identity through media and gaining access to film and video to serve their own ends and needs. On the other hand, the spread of communication technology such as home video and satellite downlinks threatens to be a final assault on culture, language, imagery, relationship between generations, and respect for traditional knowledge. (1991, Ginsburg, F., Indigenous Media: Faustian Contract or Global Village?. Cultural Anthropology, 6: 92–112)

[…]

See on globalnativenetworks.com

10

People using Facebook in extraordinary ways: “Feeding my Family” in Nunavut Facebook group

See on Scoop.itMediaMentor

A site dedicated to sharing the extraordinary, quirky and thought-provoking stories and ideas from Facebook’s community.

The “Feeding my Family” in Nunavut Facebook group
& founder Leesee Papatsie will be featured on “Facebook Stories” next week.. http://www.facebookstories.com/
“Feeding my Family”
https://www.facebook.com/groups/239422122837039/

10
See on www.facebookstories.com

UPDATE

Iqaluit woman recognized by Facebook for activist work
Leesee Papatsie used social media site to organize protests and raise awareness about food prices
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/09/04/north-facebook-iqaluit-profile.html?cmp=rss

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Simulating Bering Strait Region Oceanography – YouTube

SERNNoCa Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada videos

Subject: SERNNoCa [Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada] videos

For more information about the Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada, go to http://dl1.yukoncollege.yk.ca/sernnoca/ .

Here are all their current videos

SERNNoCa uploaded a video

2 days ago

4 views

Presentation given by Jerald Sabin, University of Toronto, during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Yellowknife, No…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa uploaded a video

2 days ago

12 views

Presentation given by Reanna Mohamed, Yukon Anti-Poverty Coalition, as a part of a panel during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summ…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa uploaded a video

3 days ago

9 views

Presentation given by Frances Abele, Carleton University, during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Yellowknife, Nor…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa uploaded a video

3 days ago

6 views

Presentation given by Brenda Parlee, University of Alberta, during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Yellowknife, N…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa uploaded a video

3 days ago

11 views

Presentation given by Michael Toye, Canadian Social Economy Hub and Canadian Community Economic Development Network (CCEDNet), during the Northern …

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

33 views

Presentation given by Margaret Johnston during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Whitehorse, Yukon from November 2n…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

29 views

Presentation given by Ed McKenna, Nunavut Anti-Poverty Secretariat during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Whiteho…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

56 views

Presentation given by Brendan Reimer from the Canadian Community Economic Development Network during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

43 views

Presentation given by Jerald Sabin, University of Toronto, during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Whitehorse, Yuk…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

60 views

Presentation given by David Natcher, University of Saskatchewan, during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Whitehors…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

68 views

Presentation given by Nick Falvo, Carleton University during the Northern Summit on the Social Economy. The Summit was held in Whitehorse, Yukon fr…

SERNNoCa

SERNNoCa

uploaded and added to Favorites

9 months ago

69 views

Presentation given by Chris Southcott, Project Director of the Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada (SERNNoCa) during the Northern Su…

SERNNoCa posted

9 months ago

For more information about the Social Economy Research Network of Northern Canada, go to http://dl1.yukoncollege.yk.ca/sernnoca/ .

GEORGE LESSARD
Information, Communications and Media Specialist
Spécialiste en l’information, communications et media

Yellowknife, Northwest Territories
X1A 2J1, Canada
Yellowknife Cell # (867) 445-9193
E-mail: mediamentorATgmailDOTcom
Website mediamentor.ca
Twitter Feed on Northern & First Nations Issues
Twitter Feed on Journalism & Media Issues
Twitter Feed on Community Radio Worldwide
Member:
Canadian Artists Representation / le Front des artistes canadiens
Canadian Artists Representation Copyright Collective

Chronicling the War of Nature vs. Greed: A Review of “Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point”

See on Scoop.itNunavut

The collected essays of Native Alaskans, environmental activists, scientists and researchers form a counternarrative to Big Oil’s PR blitz in the increasingly polluted Northern Hemisphere.
[excerpt]

Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point
Edited by Subhankar Banerjee
Seven Stories Press
New York, 2012

http://www.sevenstories.com/products/arctic-voices

According to editor Subhankar Banerjee, “the Arctic is warming at a rate double that of the rest of the planet.” This, of course, has already had a discernible impact on the animals, fish and people of the region – and beyond. As rising temperatures have put many scientists and everyday folks on high alert, they are increasingly primed for battle against profit-hungry corporations and the drill-baby-drill crowd, who see the Arctic’s immense stock of coal, oil and other natural resources as a tremendous boon – environment be damned.

The 31 essays in “Arctic Voices” contest this destructive greed. Some focus on the indigenous cultures that stand to be eradicated by the folly of energy companies; others address the visible destruction of the lands and waters of Alaska, Russia, Iceland and Greenland. Dozens of photos – both black-and-white and color – hammer the realities of contamination and pollution. It’s a sobering read, especially for urban dwellers whose existence is far removed from the subsistence lifestyle of the Gwich’in, Inupiat and Inuit people.

“We’re all connected to the northern hemisphere,” Banerjee writes in an introduction to the volume: ”

Hundreds of millions of birds migrate to the Arctic each spring from every corner of the earth – including Yellow Wagtail from Kolkata – for nesting and rearing their young and resting – a planetary celebration of global interconnectedness. On the other hand, caribou, whale and fish migrate hundreds and sometimes thousands of miles, connecting numerous indigenous communities through subsistence food harvests – local and regional interconnectedness. However, daily industrial toxins migrate to the Arctic from every part of our planet, making animals and humans of the Arctic among the most contaminated inhabitants of the earth.

Indeed, Banerjee notes that the breast milk of women in Greenland and northern Canada is “as toxic as hazardous waste.” Additionally, author Marla Cone, in an excerpt from a book entitled “Silent Snow,” presents evidence that Inuit women, who eat a diet rich in whale and seal meat, have high levels of mercury and PCBs in their bodies. As a result, when they breast feed, these poisons are passed to their offspring, putting them at risk of cancer and other diseases.
[…]

“Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point” is an eye-opening account of a precious place that few of us will ever visit. At the same time, the many writers included in the anthology not only share their love of nature, but also raise important questions about our reliance on oil, gas and coal. In addition, one basic point drives the collection. In the words of Sheila Watt-Cloutier, former chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council: “The Arctic is the barometer of the health of the planet and if the Arctic is poisoned, so are we all.”

If she’s right, and there is plenty of scientific evidence to back her claim, we’re nearing the point of no return. The contributors to Arctic Voices – scientists, indigenous people, environmental activists, researchers and scholars – have given us the tools we need to understand the calamity. As Vandana Shiva, author of “Staying Alive: Women, Ecology and Development,” writes, “The earth and her beings have been speaking. We stay deaf at our peril.”

This article is a Truthout original.

[…]

Arctic Voices: Resistance at the Tipping Point
Edited by Subhankar Banerjee
Seven Stories Press
New York, 2012
http://www.sevenstories.com/products/arctic-voices
Price: $26.96US

Format: Hardcover
Pages: 560
Pub Date: July 3, 2012
ISBN: 9781609803858

See on truth-out.org

NWT Aboriginal Woman Wins UN discrimination case against the NWT Housing Authority & Rae Edzo Housing Authority

“…The author of the communication, dated 24 June 2008, is Cecilia Kell, a Canadian aboriginal woman living in the Northwest Territories of Canada. The author claims to be the victim of violations by Canada of her rights under articles 1; 2, paragraphs (d) and (e), 14, paragraph 2 (h), 15, paragraphs 1-4, and 16, paragraph 1(h), of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women…”
Also available here
http://www.scribd.com/doc/91986514/NWT-Aboriginal-Woman-files-UN-case-for-discrimination-by-the-NWT-Housing-Authority-Rae-Edzo-Housing-Authroity

“…2.1 The author is an aboriginal woman who belongs to the community of Rae-Edzo, in the Northwest Territories in Canada. After attending college, she returned to the community as a single mother but decided to leave her three children with her relatives outside the community until she could get established and secure a home for her family. The author and her late partner, W.S. (hereinafter ―partner), began a common-law relationship in 1989.
2.2 When housing became available in the Rae-Edzo community under a scheme by a local housing authority which earmarked housing for the indigenous population, the author told her partner that she wanted to apply for a house in order to bring her children home. Without telling her, her partner applied in his name only for a unit from the Rae-Edzo Housing Authority (hereafter ―Housing Authority‖). On 1 November 1990, his application was turned down by the Housing Authority Board because he was not a member of the community, and had applied for himself as a single man. The author’s partner told her that the Housing Authority had turned her down for a house. The author could not ask her partner any questions as to why she would have been turned down without even applying because her partner was violent and abusive towards her. It was common knowledge within the Rae-Edzo community that the author and her partner had a common-law relationship. The author was informed by the Tenant Relations officer at Rae-Edzo that her partner could not apply for himself as he was not a member of the aboriginal community, and they advised her to apply for housing, listing her partner as her spouse.
2.3 The author and her partner therefore applied as a family for a house on a leasehold land, in accordance with the advice from the Housing Authority. On 7 October 1991, the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation issued an Agreement for Purchase and Sale to William Senych and Cecilia Kell as purchasers (co-owners) of the house that they moved into.
2.4 Over the next three years, the author experienced spousal abuse and the situation worsened when she got a job and became financially independent. Her partner was extremely jealous and controlled her finances, monitored her whereabouts, threatened her, prevented her from having contact with her family, assaulted her on several occasions, tried to stop her from working and took actions that resulted in her losing jobs. She was admitted a couple of times to McAteer House, a shelter for battered women in Yellowknife.
2.5 In February 1992, at the partner’s request and without the author’s knowledge, the Housing Authority wrote to the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation stating that the partner wanted the author’s name removed from the Assignment of Lease, the document that certified co-ownership of the author and her partner. Her partner was a board member of the Housing Authority Board at the time, and in June 1993, the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation complied with his request.
2.6 In early 1995, when the author took employment without her partner’s consent, the latter changed the locks on the family home and denied her access. As a result, the author had no place to go for several days, until she found a place with her employer’s help. In February 1995, when the author was allowed to enter the house to pick up a few belongings, her partner presented her with a letter from his lawyer requesting her to vacate the house by 31 March 1995. The letter further notified her that his client would exercise the remedies available to him under the law if she did not comply with his request. The author is of the opinion that she was evicted from the house by her partner because she had escaped the abusive relationship by leaving home and seeking refuge in a battered women’s shelter.
2.7 In May 1995, the author decided to file the first court action against her partner before the Supreme Court of the Northwest Territories to seek compensation for assault, battery, sexual assault, intimidation, trespass to chattels, loss of use of her home and consequential payment of rent and attendant expenses She also filed a declaration that her partner had obtained the house through fraudulent methods, aided and abetted by the Government of the Northwest Territories.1 The author applied for legal aid and was assigned a lawyer who advised her to comply with the eviction letter and not to return to her home, otherwise she would be charged.
2.8 Shortly after the first lawsuit was filed, the partner became ill with cancer and the author’s lawyer recommended that the court action be delayed. The partner died in November 1995. In March 1996, the author’s lawyer initiated the second court action against the estate of the partner, the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation and William Pourier, who was alleged to have been residing in the house with her partner at the time of his death, and who continued to reside there. The author’s claim was amended by her new counsel on 9 July 1998 to include the claim for damages for assault and intimidation, in addition to the previously submitted claim.
2.9 In May 1999, a formal offer to settle in the amount of Can$15,000 was made by the partner’s estate and the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation, while the author’s lawyer focused his efforts on negotiating a settlement of Can$20,000. No further steps were taken in respect of the author’s outstanding legal actions. Thereafter, the author’s file was reassigned twice to different lawyers because one relocated to Alberta, and the other ceased employment with the Legal Services Board. In November 1999, the author was assigned a fourth lawyer, who insisted that she accept a monetary settlement. As the author’s primary focus has always been on regaining ownership and possession of her house, she wanted to pursue her claim in court, rather than pursue a monetary settlement. As a result of the conflict between the author and her lawyer, the latter ceased acting on her behalf in June 2002. The author was then denied another legal aid lawyer and had to appeal against her denial of legal coverage to the Legal Services Board, which allowed her appeal and assigned her a fifth lawyer.
2.10 On 3 June 2003, a notice of motion was filed by her partner’s estate to set aside the author’s statement of claims, for ―want of prosecution‖ on the grounds that the author, as the party who initiated a legal action, has not diligently acted to pursue her claim.2 On 10 June 2003, the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation also brought a motion to dismiss the action. When the application for dismissal of the first action was heard in October 2003 in the Supreme Court of the Northwest Territories, the author did not contest the dismissal; therefore the first action was dismissed without appeal to the Court of Appeal for the Northwest Territories. However, the author argued against the dismissal of the second action, on the ground that the Court should have reviewed all the actions in the two cases in its assessment of whether there had been a material delay in prosecution. The author was actively responsive to the first action which was linked to the second case, therefore she considered it unjust that the Court deemed that she had taken ―no action‖ in the past few years. The second action was nevertheless dismissed on 3 November 2003 by the Supreme Court of the Northwest Territories for ―want of prosecution,‖ on the grounds that no action had been taken by the author. Costs were imposed, which were later taxed at Can$5,800.3 The author appealed against this decision in the Court of Appeal for the Northwest Territories but her appeal was dismissed without any reasons provided in writing. No further appeal was made by the author in the Supreme Court of Canada regarding the second action.
2.11 On 16 November 2004, the author initiated a new (third) action dealing solely with the issue of her interest in and right to the leasehold title and possession of the property. In January 2005, a counsel for the respondent, the partner’s estate (hereinafter the ―Estate‖), brought a motion seeking summary judgment dismissing her action or security for costs in the alternative. The property in question had been sold by the Estate to third-party purchasers and a transfer of lease had been given to them in early November 2004. The author’s position was that the Estate still held her legal title and equitable interest, which she had acquired prior to the purchasers in question. On 27 May 2005, an affidavit from the then Tenant Relations officer of Rae-Edzo was submitted during the third court action, which stated that the minutes of the meeting of the Board of Directors of the Housing Authority of 1 November 1990, denied the deceased partner’s application for housing on the grounds that he did not belong to the community, however, the said minutes were missing. The affidavit also stated that the Tenant Relations officer was instructed by the Board of Directors to contact the author and advise her to apply for housing by listing her partner as her spouse. The affidavit further stated that after the signing of the Agreement of Purchase and Sale, the original copy of the document was sent to the main office of the Northwest Housing Corporation at Yellowknife, while a copy was retained by the Tenant Relations officer for record. However both copies of the Agreement were said to be missing and lost, and that there was no explanation for the situation.
2.12 On 21 July 2005, the Supreme Court of the Northwest Territories, while hearing the application for summary dismissal in the third court action, held that since the third action sought essentially the same relief as the previous two actions, the author had to pay the amount of the taxed bill of costs in court with respect to the previous court actions as well as post security for the respondent’s costs in this third action before continuing with the case. The Court ordered that the cost payments had to be made within 60 days of the filing of the memorandum and that the case was stayed till compliance was met. As the author could not comply with the time limit set by the Court for the payment of costs and the security, the case was dismissed on 26 April 2006 by the Supreme Court of the Northwest Territories.
2.13 The author contends that she has exhausted all domestic remedies. She explains that she had to represent herself in the third case because, as a single mother, she did not have the means to retain a private lawyer. Although the author had been represented by many lawyers from the Legal Services Board over a period of 10 years, the lawyers did not comply with her instructions. She submits that a settlement had been negotiated without her consent and contrary to her instructions. She believes that as a result of her refusal of the said settlement, she was denied further legal aid and was obliged to represent herself. ….”

CEDAW-C-51-D-19-2008_en.pdf

“… They always ask that….”

nunawhaa

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