Summer Sunset along the Ingraham Trail

"Summer Sunset along the Ingraham Trail"
captured Friday, July 27, 2018

“Summer Sunset along the Ingraham Trail”
captured Friday, July 27, 2018 near Yellowknife, NWT 🇨🇦

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Are you a journalist? Download this free guide for verifying photos and videos

“…Did a migrant document his journey to Europe on Instagram? Did a young Syrian boy save a friend from danger under a hail of bullets? Did a pair of magicians pull off the ultimate photobomb by performing a trick in the background of a news report outside the Houses of Parliament?
The answer to all of these questions is — as great as the stories are — an unequivocal no. Did large, revered news organisations fall for the hoaxes? Unfortunately, yes. http://bit.ly/2aMUgD5 …”
firstdraft-vvg-photo-all

Public Photography is No Crime – PEN Canada concerned by arrest of Toronto Star photographer

EXCERPT “… We are especially concerned about the way recent trends in enforcement of non-existent prohibitions on photography and filming are affecting members of the press.
This document is not intended to be an exhaustive examination of all laws as they pertain to photography and filming. The issue is complicated and depends to some extent on laws that vary from province to province and municipality to municipality.
Subject to certain very limited constraints, it is not a crime in Canada for anyone to do any of the following things, and it is a violation of their Charter rights to prevent anyone from doing so:
– photographing or filming in any public place, or in any private place to which the public is admitted, and publishing those pictures and films,
– taking pictures of or filming in any government site other than “restricted access areas”*
– photographing or filming police officers in public, as long as the photographer/filmmaker does not obstruct or interfere with the execution of police duties. While everyone has a reasonable expectation of privacy in certain circumstances, police officers have no reasonable expectation of privacy as they go about their duties.
A police officer does not have the right to confiscate cameras or recording equipment (including phones), unless the person in possession of such equipment is under arrest and such equipment is necessarily relevant to the alleged offence. A police officer cannot force anyone to show, unlock or decrypt cameras or recording equipment, or to delete images, even when that person is under arrest, unless the police officer has a warrant or a court order permitting him to do so.
At no time, and under no circumstances, is anyone in Canada subject to arrest for the simple act of taking a photograph or filming, although he or she can be arrested if he or she is breaking another law in the process, such as, for example, trespassing or breaking or entering.
Other laws and legislation, including the Criminal Code, the Copyright Act, the Security of Information Act, the Youth Criminal Justice Act, and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), must be obeyed while taking or publishing pictures….”
https://pencanada.ca/blog/public-photography-is-not-a-crime/

Exiled to the North, a Reporter Finds a New Enemy in the RCMP

Reporter John McFadden by Walter Strong.

Except – “…When McFadden first showed up in Yellowknife, people didn’t know what to make of him. He carried a big city sense of journalistic duty to a place smaller than his hometown of Orangeville, Ontario; 20,000 vs 27,000. He gained readers quickly, but made enemies just as fast. It was the RCMP who jumped the line; banning him from news conferences, forcibly removing the writer from the courthouse in an episode that resulted in the Justice department compensating him for torn clothes. But most profoundly, it led to the Mounties challenging McFadden after he criticized the force for refusing to alert the public when sexual predators were released from prison, even though it’s a policy that was changed after the reporters’ protests. … This was merely a prelude, however, to what happened last July in Yellowknife outside the Black Knight pub, where McFadden was cuffed, thrown in a police cruiser and hauled off to the cells, where he was kept for a number of hours after being charged with obstruction of police, an offence related to pictures he was taking of a van that the police were tearing apart in one of the city’s busiest downtown neighbourhoods. McFadden claims that he was not obstructing police procedure, while the cops—three of whom were questioned on the stand a few weeks ago at the beginning of the most sensational trial in Yellowknife in the last decade—insist that he was inside the van, or “breaking the plane,” in the words of one of the officers. If the three policemen who testified produced varying accounts of the incident, one thing was consistent: McFadden, who emerged from the Black Knight after midnight to investigate the nature of the police operative (centred around the van’s stolen plates and the identification of the vehicle’s owner, a very drunk man who immediately complied with the search), was portrayed as a person who was “yelling and screaming” and creating havoc as he approached the van. The presence of the reporter might have been alarming to the constables, but it was one in which most Yellowknifers, by this point, have become familiar. You heard him, and you knew who it was. You either turned around or charged forward, depending on what kind of night you were looking to have. ..”
http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/exiled-to-the-north-a-reporter-finds-a-new-enemy-in-the-rcmp?utm_source=vicefbca

ENCOURAGING ABORIGINAL VOICES AND ISSUES IN THE MEDIA

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The CJF Aboriginal Journalism Fellowships offer two Aboriginal journalists with one to 10 years of experience the chance to explore issues of interest to First Nations, Métis or Inuit peoples. The award aims to foster better comprehension of Aboriginal issues in Canada’s major media and community outlets.
DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 19, 2016
http://cjf-fjc.ca/awards/aboriginal_fellowship
Please take a look at the award details
before submitting your application.
http://www.cjf-fjc.ca/cjf_awards/?category=aboriginalform

Pictures That Change History: Why the World Needs Photojournalists – The Atlantic

“…This week, Ron Haviv described to me the first time one of his photographs changed history.
The acclaimed war photographer was surrounded by his life’s work, which is now on exhibit in New York’s Anastasia Photo gallery. At age 23, Haviv took a photograph of supporters of Panamanian dictator General Manuel Noriega beating the country’s recently elected opposition vice president.
What is striking about the image is not just the crimson blood covering the man’s shirt. It is the Panamanian soldier standing a few feet away—doing nothing to protect him. The photograph appeared on the cover of Time, Newsweek, and U.S. News and World Report. Months later, President George H.W. Bush cited the riveting image in his speech justifying the U.S. invasion of Panama….”

Pictures That Change History: Why the World Needs Photojournalists - The Atlantic

via Pictures That Change History: Why the World Needs Photojournalists – The Atlantic.

Public Photography is No Crime | PEN Canada

Public Photography is No Crime | PEN Canada.
“…In particular, we wish to state that it is not a criminal offence for individuals to photograph or film police officers as they go about their duties, and that police officers are not allowed to confiscate a person’s camera or recording equipment (including phones), force them to delete images, or otherwise prevent them from taking photographs or filming in public places. We also wish to clarify the law when it comes to taking pictures or filming on private property that is open to the public. People are welcome to take pictures or film in malls, transportation centres, and the like, unless posted signs specifically prohibit it, or until they are requested to desist by a representative of the owners of the property.  In such an instance, though the owners or their representatives (such as a security guard) are within their right to request a halt to any further photographic activities, they have no legal right to force the deletion or destruction of photos that have already been taken.  The publication of these photos is a separate issue and may be affected by other applicable laws.
We are especially concerned about the way recent trends in enforcement of non-existent prohibitions on photography and filming are affecting members of the press.
At no time, and under no circumstances, is anyone in Canada subject to arrest for the simple act of taking a photograph or filming
This document is not intended to be an exhaustive examination of all laws as they pertain to photography and filming. The issue is complicated and depends to some extent on laws that vary from province to province and municipality to municipality….”
http://pencanada.ca/blog/public-photography-is-not-a-crime/PHOTOGRAPHY IS NO CRIME

The Great War on Photographers: A Dispatch From The Trenches

The Great War on Photographers: A Dispatch From The Trenches.

Image credits: All photographs © Karl Baden/Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston MA

Karl Baden should have known better.

I mean, what was he thinking, casually snapping a few pictures as dramatic sunlight broke through the clouds after one of last week’s late spring rainstorms? From the front seat of his car in a suburban Boston Trader Joe’s parking lot, of all places? What is he, nuts?

Image credits: All photographs © Karl Baden/Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston MA

From/via/thanks to

BRIDGING THE NWT’s DEHCHO – NEW BOOK RELEASE:

NEW BOOK RELEASE:  BRIDGING THE DEHCHO

Bill Braden's photo on the cover of NNSL's News North

Bill Braden’s photo on the cover of NNSL’s News North

“… When the NWT’s Deh Cho Bridge opened just two years ago, on November 29 2012, it brought to a close over 50 years of crossing the Mighty Mackenzie by ice bridge and ferry.  Here is a book for anyone who has ever floated on or driven across Canada’s longest river.

Bridging the #Dehcho chronicles the history, colour and drama of the Mackenzie River Crossing at Fort Providence.  From the days of the ancient Dene to the establishment of the community in 1870, to the arrival of the highway in 1960 and completion of the Deh Cho Bridge in 2012, the book also paints a contemporary portrait of the historic community of Fort Providence today.

The hardcover, 92-page book presents over 200 photos and illustrations with principle photography and writing by Yellowknife author Bill Braden, and an opening essay by adventure writer Jamie Bastedo.  It is published by the Government of the NWT, Department of Transportation, to commemorate the project.

The public is invited to the official launch at the Fort Providence Community Hall on Wednesday Dec 3 at noon, with Transportation Minister Tom Beaulieu, Deh Cho MLA Michael Nadli and author Bill Braden.   The book will go on sale (suggested retail $30) that day the Big River Service and Snowshoe Crafts in Fort Providence, and at the Yellowknife Book Cellar and Northern Frontier Visitors Centre.

For More Info:
Bill Braden 445 8953
website:  www.billbradenphoto.com
email: billbradenphoto@gmail.com …”

Deh Cho Bridge http://www.dehchobridge.info/

The Deh Cho BridgeWiki
“…This is an unofficial information site about the Deh Cho Bridge. Much like the Bridge, it is perpetually under construction. Mainly a place to organize things for myself, but there are some more generally useful bits:
– Bridge Costs – the various costs of the Bridge, including an interactive calculator.
– Bridge Summary – a basic overview of events. There’s also a timeline of the bridge project.
– Dramatis Personæ – you can’t tell the players without a scorecard. …”

We’re finally connected to the rest of Canada’: NWT residents celebrate Deh Cho bridge by JOHN ALLEMANG From Tuesday’s Globe and Mail (Includes correction) Published Monday, Dec. 03 2012, 9:49 PM EST Last updated Tuesday, Dec. 04 2012, 10:23 AM EST
‘Deh Cho Bridge ends North’s reliance on ice road – After years of controversy, delays and cost overruns, the Deh Cho Bridge opens Friday, linking Alberta and the N.W.T. ‘We’re finally connected to the rest of Canada’: NWT residents celebrate Deh Cho bridge – The Globe and Mail  “…1,045-metre Deh Cho structure towers over the flat Arctic landscape near Fort Providence, NWT, and provides the first year-round road passage across the Mackenzie to and from Yellowknife…”

After years of controversy, delays and cost overruns, the Deh Cho Bridge opens Friday, linking Alberta and the N.W.T. – Deh Cho Bridge ends North’s reliance on ice road | Toronto Star

“Photography is the story I fail to put into words” – Destin Sparks

Best Local Wedding Photographers
Destin Sparks http://www.destinsparks.com/

Destin Sparks

@DestinSparks

Panoramic Landscape Photographer. Changing the world one photo at a time.

Destin Sparks on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/destinsparks

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