“Media and reconciliation” is a Truth and Reconciliation Commission call to journalist’s action

The TRC report urges Canadian journalism programs and media schools to “require education for all students on the history of Aboriginal peoples.”

ITK’s Natan Obed scolds reporters

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau looks on as Natan Obed, President of the ITK, speaks during a press conference in Iqaluit, Nunavut “…Questions moved to the SNC-Lavalin affair, which has been dominating the news cycle in Ottawa for the last month. The shift in focus, away from human rights abuses experienced by Inuit, prompted Obed to scold reporters and remind media of its role in reconciliation.
Full transcript of his comments below:
“I think something that the media should reflect on is that throughout all of this, there has always been more important stories. And the stories of human rights abuses to Inuit. Every time there is something that happens, such as an apology today, there are other stories in the world.
But the fact that media passed right by the people whose human rights abuses were not told by the media for decades to other stories of the day is still a reflection on the work that needs to happen in reconciliation. The Inuit who were apologized today matter. This story matters. It is a Canadian story.
And I recognize that there are other media stories that matter as well. But I do hope in the future there can be more respect given to the place and time and the people who deserve to have their story told. And the media have a strong role to play to tell it.”
Obed is president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, a national non-profit organization that represents 53 communities in the north.
“Media and reconciliation” is a subsection in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s calls to action. The TRC report urges Canadian journalism programs and media schools to “require education for all students on the history of Aboriginal peoples.”….”
https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2019/03/08/natan-obed-media-snc-lavalin_a_23688192/

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Indigenous Arts & Stories competition Deadline March 31 2019

Indigenous Arts & Stories competition-Deadline

“…Ready to enter the Indigenous Arts & Stories competition online? Great! The deadline for entry is March 31. The contest is open to Canadians of Indigenous ancestry (self-identified Status, Non-Status, Inuit and Métis) between the ages of 6 and 29.
You may enter online or by mail…”
http://www.our-story.ca/submit/

“… Indigenous Arts & Stories
Indigenous Arts & Stories (formerly the Canadian Aboriginal Writing and Arts Challenge) was born in 2005 out of the success of Our Story: Aboriginal Voices on Canada’s Past published by Doubleday Canada in which nine leading Indigenous authors from across the country, including Tantoo Cardinal, Tom King and Drew Hayden Taylor, contributed a short fictional story about a defining moment in Indigenous history. The program quickly became the largest and most recognizable creative writing competition in Canada for Indigenous youth.
In 2010, Historica Canada (formerly The Historica-Dominion Institute) announced the expansion of the program into arts, making the competition available to a new audience of Indigenous youth – those who are not writers, but instead express themselves through painting, drawing and photography. We believe that the expanded program gives start to the next generation of both great Indigenous authors and artists. Indigenous Arts & Stories has earned large scale support from the Indigenous arts and literary community, including those that comprise the patrons and advisory committee. More than 3,000 emerging Indigenous writers and artists from every province and territory in Canada have participated in the contest since 2005.
The program is organized by Historica Canada, the largest independent organization devoted to enhancing awareness of Canadian history and citizenship. For more information, visit http://HistoricaCanada.ca. …”
http://www.our-story.ca/about/
“…Prêts pour enregistrer pour Arts et récits autochtones en ligne? Fantastique!
La date limite est le 31 mars. Le concours est ouvert aux Canadiens d’origine autochtone (auto-identifient, inscrit, non inscrit, Inuit ou Métis) et être âgé entre 6 et 29 ans…..”
http://www.notre-histoire.ca/soumettez

“…Arts & récits autochtones (anciennement le Concours de rédaction et d’arts pour autochtones) est né en 2005 du succès de Our Story: Aboriginal Voices on Canada’s Past, publié par DoubleDay Canada.
Dans cet ouvrage, neuf grands auteurs autochtones provenant de partout au pays, dont Tantoo Cardinal, Tom King et Drew Hayden Taylor, ont rédigé une nouvelle sur un épisode déterminant de l’histoire autochtone. Depuis lors, le concours est devenu l’épreuve de rédaction la plus importante et la plus identifiable qui soit destinée à la jeunesse autochtone du Canada. Il a obtenu l’appui à grande échelle des membres des milieux artistiques et littéraires autochtones, dont les membres d’honneur et du comité consultatif. Depuis 2005, plus de 3 000 écrivains et artistes autochtones émergents de tous les territoires et les provinces du Canada ont participé au concours.
En 2010, Historica Canada (anciennement l’Institut Historica-Dominion) a annoncé l’expansion de ce concours. Cette expansion rend le concours accessible à un nouvel auditoire de jeunes Autochtones : ceux qui, au lieu d’écrire, s’expriment par la peinture, par le dessin et par la photographie. Nous croyons que l’enrichissement du concours donne naissance à une nouvelle génération de grands auteurs et de grands artistes autochtones.
Le programme est organisé par Historica Canada, le principal organisme indépendant dont la mission consiste à mieux sensibiliser la population à l’histoire et à la citoyenneté canadiennes. Pour tout complément d’information, veuillez consulter le site à l’adresse HistoricaCanada.ca….”
http://www.notre-histoire.ca/apropos

Political satirist Tom Walker [Jonathan Pie​] on the purpose behind his satire

 

“… Political satirist Tom Walker, best known for his viral comedy character Jonathan Pie​ talks to Krishnan Guru-Murthy about the purpose behind his satire, why the left need to reclaim freedom of speech and how he’d change the world if given the chance. …” https://youtu.be/1_6APlOR_jg

For writers: How “The Christmas Song” can improve your #writing and ‘get inside’ your reader

“…What’s your favourite Christmas lyric – or song?
I get tired of Christmas songs this time of year – yet I never tire of The Christmas Song.

You know… ” Chestnuts roasting on an open fire…”

As a writer and writing teacher and adviser to the writing retreat, Sirenia, I often use “The Christmas Song” as a good example of using ‘desciptive sense triggers’ to ‘get inside’ readers’.

Christmas sentiments have been said many times – many ways – but this song really “gets inside me” and is so real because of the power of the sensory language – appealing to many senses.

I live in Australia where it’s summer at Christmas time – yet I fondly remember my North American December-January Winter “Christmas” experiences.
This song brings back those memories because the lyrics trigger sense memories – sight and smells and sounds and the feeling of cold.
Just look at how many sensory triggers are packed into the first verse…”

via For writers: How “The Christmas Song” can improve your #writing and ‘get inside’ your reader

L’industrie du podcast au Canada et Québec & @PopUpArchive audio/podcast search engine + @Apple = downloads

Pop Up Archive screan-cap_1298

Excerpts “… Here’s something you need to know: I’ve learned that Apple has acquired Pop Up Archive, the Oakland-based online platform focused on building tools to transcribe, organize, and search audio files. Among its suite of tools was the podcast search engine Audiosear.ch, which wound down operations on November 28, presumably in the wake of closing the acquisition.
Pop Up Archive https://popuparchive.com/ @PopUpArchive http://twitter.com/PopUpArchive was founded in 2012, and has since grown off an extended series of seed investments and grants from sources like Bloomberg Beta, 500 Startups, and the Knight Foundation, among others. The company also has a close relationship with PRX; in 2012, the two organizations partnered up to build Pop Up’s original web-based archive system.
A quick disclaimer: I’ve collaborated with Pop Up Archive on live events in the past, and have worked extensively with its CEO, Anne Wootton. But I don’t have any additional insight into the move. (Not at this point in time, anyway.) The only official statement I could get from Cupertino said: “Apple buys smaller technology companies from time to time, and we generally do not discuss our purpose or plans.”
That said, I’m pretty sure you can put two and two together with what’s on paper: Apple, long the dominant hands-off steward of the podcast universe, has acquired a technology dedicated to increasing the knowability and sortability of the hundreds of thousands of shows distributed through its Apple Podcast platform. This, as you can imagine, has widespread implications for the ecosystem. Apple is believed to still drive somewhere between 50 to 70 percent of all available podcasts downloads, depending on who’s measuring — it’s near impossible to quantify this with any precision — and it’s further worth noting that this news comes months after Apple’s original announcement of in-episode analytics, which was scheduled to roll out around this end point of the year following the introduction of iOS 11 in September. (Indeed, it’s entirely possible that this has already been happening, perhaps in batches.) …”
http://www.niemanlab.org/2017/12/apple-has-acquired-pop-up-archive-an-interesting-startup-that-makes-podcasts-more-searchable/
Pop Up Archive https://popuparchive.com/ + podcast search engine http://audiosear.ch/

Et l’industrie du podcast au Canada et Québec.

“.. Notes from North of the Border, Part 3. I’m going to wrap this series up with three quick snapshots of the CBC, Radio-Canada, and a freelance producer working in Toronto.
(1) Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The CBC, of course, plays a considerable role in the country’s budding podcast industry. It functions as the primary provider of jobs, and its various advantages in the space come from the long-established scale, reach, and branding via decades of its legacy in broadcasting. Last month, the CBC welcomed the third season of its true crime podcast, Someone Knows Something, which would go on to drive 2.3 million downloads in the first week. (It should be noted, however, that all six episodes were dropped at once on November 6, a move that’s being deployed more commonly nowadays).

I sent over a few questions to get a better sense of how the CBC is thinking about podcasts, and Susan Marjetti, the organization’s executive director of radio and audio, sent back some responses.

What is the CBC’s perspective on podcasts? Does it see the medium as part of the digital mix, or is it something that may replace broadcast operations one day?

[…]

What’s the general opinion at the CBC about opportunities in the media for young Canadians? One of the bigger trends I’ve noticed is talented young Canadians crossing the border a whole lot, and I’m wondering if the CBC is aggressively thinking about that dynamic and how it’s handling that outflow of talent.

[…]

Hmm.

[…]

Hmm.

(2) Meanwhile, in Quebec. There is also, to be sure, activity in the Francophone region of Quebec. Tally Abecassis, the Montreal-based creator of First Day Back http://firstdaybackpodcast.com/ (now at Stitcher https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/first-day-back-podcast/first-day-back ), was recently on a panel about “the invisible Quebec podcast,” and she was kind enough to share her notes from the festivities. She writes:

“The franco Quebec scenes feels like where the US scene was 3+ years ago. There is a lot of buzz about podcasts, but there aren’t many yet that are made as podcast-only (as opposed to Radio-Canada shows that they throw online). https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/les-mysterieux-etonnants-530873 Some of note: Les Mysterieux Etonnants http://www.mysterieuxetonnants.com/  https://www.facebook.com/mysterieuxetonnants/ https://vimeo.com/mysterieuxe (about comics), T’es ou Youssef? (a serialized show that looked into one young man’s radicalization). http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/les_samedis_du_monde/2010-2011/chronique.asp?idChronique=428807 http://zonevideo.telequebec.tv/a-z/587/t-es-ou-youssef There are no companies yet selling or brokering ads.”
“The one podcast in French that actually sell ads is one published out of business mag Les Affaires. It’s geared at entrepreneurs and called Les Dérangeants. The host Matthieu Charest was at this panel and he said it wasn’t hard to find sponsors who wanted to reach their listeners (like Desjardins Credit Union, for example). He said they are at 30,000 downloads.” Abecassis would later follow up on those numbers: “Les Dérangeants aimed for 30K downloads, but are at 40K over 13 eps.”
http://www.lesaffaires.com/dossier/les-derangeants/les-derangeants-un-tout-premier-podcast-sur-lesaffairescom/594474
“Otherwise Radio-Canada just released Disparue(s), a cold case mystery along the lines of what the English side did with Someone Knows Something. http://www.cbc.ca/radio/sks It has been a breakout hit and no doubt has done a lot to bring some of the radio audience over to podcasts.”
http://ici.radio-canada.ca/premiere/emissions/gravel-le-matin/segments/entrevue/36979/disparues-marie-paule-rochette-balado-disparue-stephane-berthomet

Radio-Canada http://servicesfrancais.radio-canada.ca/ , by the way, is the franco-wing of the country’s public broadcasting operations. I was able to get in touch with Xavier K. Richard, the digital innovation coordinator at the organization, who explained the structure to me: “As the Canadian Government is bilingual, there are a specific budget for English services and one for French services, and with such budget distinct strategies. CBC Montreal, for example, is part of the English Services budgets. Both CBC and Radio-Canada share local stations around the country, but French employees are quite centralized in Montreal (where is the RC HQ), in Ontario and in local stations of the Province of Quebec, as goes the demography for French Canadians.”

(3) Miscellaneous. As with all scenes, the ecosystem is made up of institutions and disparate independent projects. Over Twitter, Katie Jensen, a Toronto-based freelance producer, flagged two such productions she’s been working on: The Secret Life of Canada http://www.thesecretlifeofcanada.com/ and Safe Space. https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/safe-space/id1194793637?mt=2  http://www.metronews.ca/features/safe-space.html She also highlighted a show by The Globe and Mail, Colour Code, by Hannah Sung and Denise Balkissoon. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/colour-code-podcast-race-in-canada/article31494658/ Thanks, Katie! …”

Excerpted from:
http://www.niemanlab.org/2017/12/apple-has-acquired-pop-up-archive-an-interesting-startup-that-makes-podcasts-more-searchable/  By Nicholas Quah is the founder and writer of Hot Pod, a newsletter about podcasts that appears on Nieman Lab. http://www.niemanlab.org/author/nquah/

 

 

Ancestors – ᓯᕗᓪᓖᑦ Writing Competition For Nunavut Youth.

Ancestors – ᓯᕗᓪᓖᑦ Writing Competition For Nunavut Youth.
Format: Essay or short story
Length: Minimum 250 words and up to 500 words
Submission deadline: Friday, April 15, 2016, midnight PT
Prizes: 1st Prize $300.00, 2nd Prize $200.00 3rd Prize $100.00
Theme: Pre-colonization Inuit with a focus on *social organization, ᐃᓄᑐᖃᐃᑦ ᐃᓕᖁᓯᑐᖃᖏᑦ ᐊᑐᖅᖢᒋᑦ ᐃᓅᖃᑎᒋᓐᓂᖅ.
Submissions to:
Susan Aglukark arcticrose2016@gmail.com – subject line – Ancestors 2016
Word Challenge: Use two traditional Inuktitut words on the verge of being lost.
Goal: To better understand the traditional Inuit society and by extension its respect of life’s cycle.
Preamble: My mother pointed out to me some years ago that there is a difference between learning and becoming educated ᐃᓕᑦᓯᓂᖅ and ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᓂᖅ, this was a profound moment for me as it was then that I began to understand that Inuit have a long history of learning and teaching which also meant and means that we were a highly organized and functioning society with a high respect for life and capacity to learn.
The theme in this writing competition then is “Traditional Society”, to find an area in the traditional social historical past and explain it in an essay or story format, this can be written in all Inuktitut or all English but be sure to include at least 2 traditional Inuktitut words that we do not hear in our current daily dialogue.

#Inuktitut #Radio #JOBS in #KUUJUAQ #Nunavik #Quebec

logo_tni_header_180x180
Inuktitut JOB OPPORTUNITIES- IN KUUJUAQ, Nunavik, Quebec: Taqramiut Nipinqat Inc. the Inuit Radio and Television Company of Nunavik, “… invites interested and motivated persons to apply for the positions of Radio Producers (2 positions) for our radio production center in Kuujjuaq.
We are looking for candidates who are outgoing and motivated to work as Radio Producers.
The candidates who don’t have experience will have the opportunity to work alongside a radio production trainer who will teach them how to use the radio equipment and create their own radio shows which will be broadcast on the Taqramiut Nipingat’s regional radio network.
Radio Producers (2 positions)
Under the supervision of the Office Operations Manager, the Radio Producers prepare radio programs and segments for broadcast related to traditional and cultural issues. The main tasks related to these positions are to identify story and program ideas, operate production equipment, read, host, announce and interview on and off air.
The candidates that we are looking for have an interest in the field of communication and are willing to learn the profession. You must be fluent in Inuktitut. Experience in the field of communication and knowledge of another language (English or French) would be definite assets. Training will be provided during employment.
Please submit your resume before 5:00pm on May 25th 2015 to:
Julie Grenier
Office Manager
Taqramiut Nipingat Inc
PO Box 360
Kuujjuaq, Quebec
JOM ICO
Tel: (819) 964-1999 (207)
Fax:(819)964-1555
E-mail: jgrenier@taqramiut.qc.ca ….”
* Application Forms are also available upon request.
Web: http://www.tni-rtn.com/
Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/TaqramiutNipingat

https://www.facebook.com/TaqramiutNipingat/photos/pcb.816918461722744/816918231722767/?type=1&theater

The Epic #PooRace or ” #flush the right stuff ” in 8 parts from #Canmore #AB #GreyH2O

Epic Poo Race.

The Epic Poo Race or “flush the right stuff” http://ow.ly/HQecx in 8 parts from Canmore AB

“… http://www.canmore.ca/images/stories/Website_Banners/Episode002.jpg …”

Part Two

The survival of a culture at the brink; CKLB, Beacon of Aboriginal language silenced — Northern Journal

Beacon of Aboriginal language silenced

The survival of a culture at the brink — Northern Journal

via The survival of a culture at the brink — Northern Journal.

The shutdown of CKLB and the silencing of its Aboriginal language programming is a loss for all Northerners; and if reports that as many as a dozen Aboriginal language radio stations across the country may soon lose the financial means to continue their own programming are true, all Canadians will suffer a loss. In particular, the termination of CKLB and other radio stations like it is a serious blow to the ongoing efforts to revive Aboriginal language and culture.

CKLB is listened to in many Northern communities where Aboriginal languages are still used routinely by elders and the middle-aged, giving youth a chance to learn and carry on their ancestral languages. Taking that away is a great setback.

Not supporting the return of Aboriginal languages, while supplanting youth completely within English language instruction in schools – in order to facilitate a more efficient economic model – is as colonial in its way as residential schools were.

The cultures of Canada’s first peoples have been under siege for over 200 years, including targeted and systematic efforts to kill them off; but in the last 40 years, language and culture have begun to draw back from the brink. There has been a pervasive rekindling of awareness and pride in culture by First Nations across Canada in recent years. Youth are more engaged, the culture is being revitalized and the languages are being used. The drums are beating again. Granted, Aboriginal languages are second to English in most First Nation homes and youth struggle to learn their mother tongue, but at least the languages are still alive, their use actually growing…..”

#NWT #NWTpoli @dehchomla: CKLB #aborigin

#NWT #NWTpoli @dehchomla: CKLB #aboriginal #radio in jeopardy awaiting federal funding http://t.co/hKxoyoSAyf seeks donations

hi-cklb-radio-building-yk

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