The Design and Development of Digital Return Platforms for Northern Indigenous Heritage (PDF)

Digital Return Platforms for Northern Indigenous Heritage screan-cap_1062

Executive Summary

“… Digital return technologies offer Indigenous communities a means of repatriating objects and knowledge gathered from their ancestors as part of earlier colonial endeavors. Many third party institutions such as museums, universities, and government heritage agencies, retain possession of these collections because of the perceived impracticality of returning them to source communities.
The concept of digital repatriation or “digital return” has emerged as a means of rebuilding relationships between source communities and third party institutions through the transfer of knowledge and objects in digital form. In this way, digital return systems, such as online archives, electronic atlases and digital databases, are excellent examples of disruptive technologies.
The idea of disruptive technologies was first popularized by Clayton Christensen in his 1997 book “The Innovator’s Dilemma”. Disruptive technologies are technological innovations that upset networks supporting the existing state of affairs. Digital return acts as a disruptive technology because it disrupts established institutional models for archiving, accessing, and interpreting objects and cultural knowledge.
Paradoxically, digital return also disrupts traditional Indigenous networks that support how objects and cultural knowledge are accessed and circulated by making them freely available on the public Internet . Resolving this paradox requires that we identify and address existing knowledge gaps in both the sociocultural and technological sides of digital return.
A three-part scoping review of Indigenous digital return projects in regions of the North American and European Arctic was undertaken to: a) identify the extent and objectives of academic, government, and community-led digital return projects; b) characterize the digital return methodologies currently used in arctic communities; c) identify the issues and challenges facing digital return projects within the study area; and d) draw attention to heritage initiatives that are grass roots and community led.
The methods used in this study include: a) bibliometric analysis of electronic databases; b) online surveys of digital return projects; and c) a case study of community-led heritage organizations and their projects. …”
PDF http://www.idees-ideas.ca/sites/default/files/sites/default/uploads/general/2016/2016-sshrc-ksg-dawson_0.pdf

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Salvage Movie DOC about the Yellowknife city dump

salvage-movie-uc2gjnuo_400x400

Salvage Movie “… A documentary about salvaging items from the Yellowknife city dump and the community dedicated to this beloved tradition. A film by Amy C. Elliott, in post. Yellowknife http://salvagemovie.com/  filmmakers@salvagemovie.com
“…Salvage is a feature-length documentary about the city dump in Yellowknife, Canada. In Yellowknife, the remote capitol of the Northwest Territories, the town dump is the city’s most popular and notorious manmade attraction, mined by a colorful community of thrifty locals. But the new city administration is determined to see it tamed, and the battle for Yellowknife’s identity is on. …”

On Twitter @SalvageMovie https://twitter.com/SalvageMovie

Demolition video of Yellowknife’s Robertson Head Frame Oct 29th, 2016

A very sad moment

Demolition video of Yellowknife’s Robertson Head Frame Oct 29th, 2016

Demolition video still of Yellowknife’s Robertson Head Frame Oct 29th, 2016

“… Hundreds watch Yellowknife’s Robertson headframe fall to the ground – Many show up for blast at 5 p.m. MT Saturday, hundreds more watch from Australia, N.S., Alaska
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/hundreds-watch-robertson-headframe-blast-1.3828368
N.W.T. gov’t won’t save Yellowknife’s Robertson headframe
Agreement could not be reached with mine owner, says GNWT
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/nwt-gov-t-won-t-save-con-mine-robertson-headframe-1.3701613
“…The Con Mine (1938-2003) was the first gold mine developed in the Northwest Territories, just south of Yellowknife.[1] The property was staked by Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada (Cominco) in September 1935 in response to the discovery of visible gold nearby; the name “Con” is an abbreviation of “Consolidated”. The advent of winter prevented any prospecting from being conducted, but work in the summer of 1936 led to the discovery of numerous gold veins. The Con Mine entered production in 1938 and ceased operations in 2003. It has produced over 5,000,000 ozt (160,000 kg) of gold from 12,195,585 tons of ore processed.[2] The mine was over 6,000 ft (1,800 m) deep.[3]…”
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Con_Mine

Video runs 01:58

Iqqaumavara – Je m’en souviens, I Remember, ᐃᕐᖃᐅᒪᕙᕋIqqaumavara | Je m’en souviens

Iqqaumavara – Je m’en souviens, I Remember, ᐃᕐᖃᐅᒪᕙᕋIqqaumavara | Je m’en souviens.

 

ᐃᕐᖃᐅᒪᕙᕋ

ᐃᕐᖃᐅᒪᒋᔭᐅᑦᓴᐃᓇᖁᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᐃᓚᒌᑦ ᓱᕐᕋᑕᐅᔪᕕᓃᑦ ᑕᒪᑦᓱᒧᖓ ᐱᓗᑲᓐᓂᕕᓂᕐᒧᑦ ᐃᓅᖃᑎᒋᔭᓂ.
ᐊᖏᓂᕐᐹᖅ ᖃᕆᑕᐅᔭᒃᑯᑦ ᑐᑭᓯᓂᐊᕐᕕᐅᒍᓐᓇᑐᖅ ᐃᓄᐃᑦ ᓅᑕᐅᓂᕕᓂᖓᑕ ᖁᑦᓯᑐᒧᑦ ᒥᑦᓵᓄᑦ 1953ᒥ 1955ᒥᓗ.


ᐃᓄᑦᑎᑐᑦ

 

 

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Logo http://i0.wp.com/www.iqqaumavara.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/oie_6182544SMWKQ8cL.png?w=625

“… Je m’en souviens

Pour préserver la mémoire des familles touchées par ce drame humain.
La plus grande source d’information sur le web dédiée à la réinstallation forcée d’Inuit en Extrême Arctique en 1953 et 1955.


Français

 

 

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Incredible Time-Lapse Captures Up Close & Personal View of a Supercell Forming

Incredible Time-Lapse Captures Up Close & Personal View of a Supercell Forming

via Incredible Time-Lapse Captures Up Close & Personal View of a Supercell Forming.

http://youtu.be/VoO89cqDgJU

“…If there was ever a time to use the term jaw-dropping, this might very well be it. Because while we’ve seen some amazing footage and even more amazing pictures of supercells and other spectacular weather phenomena, this (GoPro?) time-lapse by the storm chasers at Bashunters Chasing is really something to behold.

At two minutes long, it won’t take you very long at all to sit down, click the fullscreen button and get a serious dose of respect for the power of nature….”

Blue Future: Maude Barlow Event in Yellowknife | NWT Chapter – Council of Canadians

Blue Future: Maude Barlow Event in Yellowknife | NWT Chapter – Council of Canadians.

http://cocnwt.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/1236648_233632970123068_952471679_n.jpg

 

Blue Future: Protecting Water for People and the Planet Forever
Featuring Maude Barlow
Wednesday, October 30 (7:00 – 9:00 pm)
Northern United Place
5403 Franklin Avenue, Yellowknife (map)

Invite your friends to the Facebook event.

Please join the Council of Canadians’ NWT Chapter for a thought-provoking evening with Council of Canadians’ National Chairperson Maude Barlow, one of the world’s foremost experts on water.

Maude will be discussing the world’s growing water crisis and the fight to protect our most precious resource. Drawing from her recently released book, Blue Future, Maude will bring the global context to unfolding water issues in the Northwest Territories.

Copies of Maude’s new book, Blue Future, will be available for purchase, and Maude will be signing books after her presentation.

About Maude Barlow

Maude Barlow is the National Chairperson of the Council of Canadians and chairs the board of Washington-based Food and Water Watch. She is a board member of the San Francisco–based International Forum on Globalization and a Councillor with the Hamburg-based World Future Council.

Maude is the recipient of eleven honorary doctorates as well as many awards, including the 2005 Right Livelihood Award (known as the “Alternative Nobel”), the 2005 Lannan Foundation Cultural Freedom Fellowship Award, the Citation of Lifetime Achievement at the 2008 Canadian Environment Awards, the 2009 Earth Day Canada Outstanding Environmental Achievement Award, the 2009 Planet in Focus Eco Hero Award, and the 2011 EarthCare Award, the highest international honour of the Sierra Club (US).

In 2008/2009, she served as Senior Advisor on Water to the 63rd President of the United Nations General Assembly and was a leader in the campaign to have water recognized as a human right by the UN. She is also the author of dozens of reports, as well as 17 books, including her latest, Blue Future: Protecting Water For People And The Planet Forever.

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