Mass media in crisis, so is journalism « Social Policy in Ontario

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“Instead of using technology to bridge the communications gap between voters in their communities and the media, the media have used it to turn their backs on the public, forging closer links with the people reporters cover …

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The digital age has transformed the media and political communication landscape, but it’s not necessarily for the better, argues an important new volume How Canadians Communicate IV: Media and Politics, published by Athabasca University Press.

“The media now play a shrinking role in informing Canadians about politics and public policy,” writes Carleton University journalism professor Christopher Waddell, co-editor of the recently released book. “Instead of using technology to bridge the communications gap between voters in their communities and the media, the media have used it to turn their backs on the public, forging closer links with the people reporters cover rather than with the people who used to read, watch, and listen to their reporting.”

The book features a “vigorous debate” on how political discourse has changed in today’s internet society, and the traditional media’s role in all of it.

Mr. Waddell, a former Globe and Mail national editor and a former CBC TV Parliamentary bureau chief, writes in a chapter called “Berry’d Alive: The Media, Technology and the Death of Political Coverage” that there is a “gulf” between Canadians, on one side, and politicians and the media, on the other.

“The media have come to identify more closely with politicians than with the public,” Mr. Waddell writes.

How Canadians Communicate is co-edited by David Taras. It features 16 essays from various experts, including Earnscliffe Strategy Group’s Elly Alboim, also a former CBC TV Parliamentary bureau chief and a journalism professor at Carleton University in Ottawa, whose chapter is called “On the Verge of Total Dysfunction: Government Media and Communications” and University of Calgary professor Tom Flanagan, who writes about the “permanent campaign.”

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The Power of Photography

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Hello, I am Riagan McMahon blogging about the experiences I was fortunate to have at The Washington Journalism and Media Conference. I am a senior at Saratoga Springs High School and an aspiring communications and public relations …

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School districts take different approach to social media – Baldwin City Signal

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School districts take different approach to social mediaBaldwin City SignalFacebook in his journalism classes and as a tool to communicate with parents of students in his journalism and English classes.

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Mexican Scholar Stresses Community Radio Role in Cuba – Radio Cadena Agramonet

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Radio Cadena AgramonetMexican Scholar Stresses Community Radio Role in CubaRadio Cadena AgramonetCommunity radio stations have a relevant and indispensable role in promoting people”s culture, said here Mexican expert Angelica Hernandez, invited to…

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Journalists’ Union Threatens Strike Over Government Interference in Media – Tunisia Live

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Tunisia LiveJournalists’ Union Threatens Strike Over Government Interference in MediaTunisia LiveThe journalists are angry at what they see as, in the words of journalist and media expert Hichem Snoussi, “a war against freedom of press and…

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Determining Journalistic Fairness is Job of Citizens, Not Government – Collegenews.org

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Collegenews.orgDetermining Journalistic Fairness is Job of Citizens, Not GovernmentCollegenews.orgThis month marks the 25th anniversary of the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to stop enforcing a policy known as the Fairness Doctrine.

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Community radio: giving a localised touch – The Hindu

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The HinduCommunity radio: giving a localised touchThe HinduPeople Studies, Loyola College and UNICEF, jointly organised a two-day State level workshop-cum-consultation on women, children and community radio in Loyola College, Nungambakkam, from…

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There’s talk of Bell Canada.. so does that included Northwestel?

WordsByNowak

We couldn’t have a week of broadband fun here on the blog without talking about that old favourite topic: throttling. You know, what internet providers do to online services and applications they don’t like, and/or that may compete with things they sell.

A group of researchers from around the globe have been using M-Labs, a tool set up by Google, for a while now to keep tabs on internet service providers and their throttling. Back in October of last year, they found that since 2008, Rogers had been the worst ISP in the world when it came to slowing down customers’ connections.

In February, the cable company promised to phase out throttling by the end of this year, with about half of all customers to see results starting in June.

The latest quarterly M-Labs results set a pretty good baseline against which to compare throughout the rest of the year…

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Simulating Bering Strait Region Oceanography – YouTube

Like the work of most great artists, the best of Walker Evans’ pictures are marvels of contradiction. Or, rather, they acquire their power through the contradictions they deftly reconcile. One especially striking example: a photograph from 1930 (slide 11 in this gallery) comprised of elements so incongruous that, taken together, they really should not bear scrutiny for more than a few moments before the viewer, shrugging indifferently, moves on.

Read more: http://lightbox.time.com/2012/08/15/walker-evans-american-photographs/#ixzz23eS2bcgD

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