Mass media in crisis, so is journalism « Social Policy in Ontario

See on Scoop.itMediaMentor

“Instead of using technology to bridge the communications gap between voters in their communities and the media, the media have used it to turn their backs on the public, forging closer links with the people reporters cover …

[excerpt]

The digital age has transformed the media and political communication landscape, but it’s not necessarily for the better, argues an important new volume How Canadians Communicate IV: Media and Politics, published by Athabasca University Press.

“The media now play a shrinking role in informing Canadians about politics and public policy,” writes Carleton University journalism professor Christopher Waddell, co-editor of the recently released book. “Instead of using technology to bridge the communications gap between voters in their communities and the media, the media have used it to turn their backs on the public, forging closer links with the people reporters cover rather than with the people who used to read, watch, and listen to their reporting.”

The book features a “vigorous debate” on how political discourse has changed in today’s internet society, and the traditional media’s role in all of it.

Mr. Waddell, a former Globe and Mail national editor and a former CBC TV Parliamentary bureau chief, writes in a chapter called “Berry’d Alive: The Media, Technology and the Death of Political Coverage” that there is a “gulf” between Canadians, on one side, and politicians and the media, on the other.

“The media have come to identify more closely with politicians than with the public,” Mr. Waddell writes.

How Canadians Communicate is co-edited by David Taras. It features 16 essays from various experts, including Earnscliffe Strategy Group’s Elly Alboim, also a former CBC TV Parliamentary bureau chief and a journalism professor at Carleton University in Ottawa, whose chapter is called “On the Verge of Total Dysfunction: Government Media and Communications” and University of Calgary professor Tom Flanagan, who writes about the “permanent campaign.”

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About @mediamentor
Information Curation, Communication & Media / Cure d'information, communication et medias http://mediamentor.ca

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